Week of July 21, 2014

Monday

Planned chaos in the Middle East—and beyond*
By Ismael Hossein-zadeh

Geopolitical observers of the Middle East turbulence tend to blame the raging chaos in the area on the presumed failure of the “incoherent,” “illogical” or “contradictory” policies of the United States. Irrefutable evidence (some of which presented in this study) suggests, however, that, in fact, the chaos represents the success, not failure, of those policies—policies that are designed by the beneficiaries of war and military adventures in the region, and beyond.

Malaysian air crash was not the fault of Putin
By Jerry Mazza

The most heartbreaking thing is to view Ukrainian refugees on Russia Today (RT.com), children, parents, men, women, crying, still trying to fathom how and why they lost their homes, loved ones, and future. And in addition to this, have seen the Malaysian Flight MH17 with 298 people on board fall out of the air, apparently over the Ukraine.

Sanctions and airliners
By Paul Craig Roberts

The unilateral US sanctions announced by Obama on July 16 blocking Russian weapons and energy companies access to US bank loans demonstrate Washington’s impotence. The rest of the world, including America’s two largest business organizations, turned their backs on Obama. The US Chamber of Commerce and the National Association of Manufacturers placed ads in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post protesting US sanctions. NAM said that the manufacturer’s association is “disappointed that the US is extending sanctions in increasingly unilateral ways that will undermine US commercial engagement.” Bloomberg reported that “meeting in Brussels, leaders of the European Union refused to match the US measures.”

Questions raised about government institute director
By Martha Rosenberg

It has been four years since Thomas Insel, M.D., director of the National Institute of Mental Health, was suspected of pharmaceutical conflicts of interest. According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, he assured the dean of the University of Miami medical school that if the dean hired Charles Nemeroff, government money would not be denied to U. of Miami.

Fake TSA clerk gropes women at SFO; but hey, no harm, no foul
By Lisa Simeone

Ah, I love waking up to stories like this! It’s like living in absurdist theater, only the people running the theater are too stupid to see it for what it is.

Tuesday

What happened to the Malaysian airliner?
By Paul Craig Roberts

Washington’s propaganda machine is in such high gear that we are in danger of losing the facts that we do have.

No winners in this Gaza conflict
By Linda S. Heard

The root of the carnage in Gaza is Israel’s occupation, colony expansion, blockade of the Strip and reticence to get serious about peace, so it’s little wonder that Hamas refuses to accept a ceasefire based on the ‘peace for peace’ 2012 model. Its demands include a complete lifting of Israel’s siege on the Strip, the reopening of the Rafah crossing to Egypt 24/7 and a reconstruction plan for Gaza.

Something is rotten in the state of Denmark
By Wayne Madsen

NATO charter member Denmark has been a sycophantic ally of the United States for most of the years following the founding of the Western military alliance in 1949. Until 1949, many Danes favored the creation of a neutralist military bloc of Nordic nations that would steer clear of American and Soviet military alliances. This attitude by the Danes irked Washington. A recently declassified Central Intelligence Agency document titled Neutrality and Third Force Tendencies in Western Europe and dated December 19, 1950, bemoaned the presence of neutralists in Denmark …

Comical … if it weren’t so sad
By Joseph M. Cachia

Evidently, not much has changed in our foreign policy since Gonzi (former Prime Minister of Malta) took us into the Libyan war! However, rest assured that the people would judge you all when they awake!

Keepers and patients
By Jerry Mazza

At a lunch with some “old friends,” we were talking about our adult children and one of my friends, Vincent Amato, a corpulent fellow with a thick graying beard and longish hair, a wonderful sense of humor and love of history—mentioned that his son had become brutish as some kind of social worker. The son credited that to the fact that Vincent divorced his son’s mother and step-mother. I added that I have a daughter with an MSM from Fordham University and her mother and I were divorced. My other friend Frank Tolopko summed up the situation by saying, “wouldn’t it be funny if the world turned out to be all keepers and patients?” I said,“ It would be a psychological welfare state. We’re almost there.”

Wednesday

Guilt by insinuation
How American propaganda works
By Paul Craig Roberts

Why hasn’t Washington joined Russian President Putin in calling for an objective, non-politicized international investigation by experts of the case of the Malaysian jetliner?

The rising global movement that calls for #noTTIP
By Adam Parsons

As the next round of negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) took place in Brussels last week, civil society groups were continuing to mobilise against this ongoing free trade agreement between the U.S. and EU that poses a threat to our public services, environment, food, privacy and democracy. On Saturday, around a thousand people occupied the square in front of the European Union’s base in London, UK, and demanded an end to the trade deal that is being described by the #noTTIP coalition of activists and organisations as an unprecedented corporate power-grab.

The stealing of America by the cops, the courts, the corporations and congress
By John W. Whitehead

Call it what you will—taxes, penalties, fees, fines, regulations, tariffs, tickets, permits, surcharges, tolls, asset forfeitures, foreclosures, etc.—but the only word that truly describes the constant bilking of the American taxpayer by the government and its corporate partners is theft.

Hair loss drug linked to disturbing side effects that be permanent
By Martha Rosenberg

No one should have to choose between their hairline and their health. But increasingly, men who use finasteride, commonly known as Propecia, to treat their male pattern baldness are making that choice, often unwittingly. In the 17 years since Propecia was approved to treat hair loss from male pattern baldness, so many disturbing urogenital and other side effects have emerged, the term Post Finasteride Syndrome (PFS) has been coined and hundreds of lawsuits have been brought.

History trips and the vanished left
By Howard Lisnoff

Visiting the FDR Library and Museum is like journeying to a place where time has stopped and a world much different from the one we now inhabit exists. I hadn’t been to the FDR Presidential Library in several years and eagerly anticipated seeing the newly renovated museum at the library. Here there are no disappointments. FDR’s New Deal and progressive/left politics jump out from every nook and cranny of the exhibit, and the interactive displays of his presidency are so well done that they immediately catch museum goers’ attention and interest.

Thursday

The New Republic is queen of the presstitutes
By Paul Craig Roberts

According to the latest reports, the separatists in Donetsk have handed over to Malaysian authorities the black boxes from the downed Malaysian airliner, which indicates that those who have been blamed by Washington and the Western presstitute media have nothing to fear from the facts.

Gaza’s resistance will not be crushed
By Ramzy Baroud

On the 13th day of Israel’s so-called Operation Protective Edge, stories of entire families collectively pulverized, women and children keenly targeted by Israeli soldiers saturate the media. Until now, 430 Palestinians have been killed, mostly women and children, and 18 Israel soldiers been killed at the hands of the Resistance. In Shejaiya, elders, mothers and children scrambled for cover as shells mercilessly rained down, stealing the souls of countless innocents.

The end of Israel
By Gilad Atzmon

In his speech to the nation Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu acknowledged yesterday that the war on Gaza is a battle for the existence of the Jewish State. Netanyahu is correct. And Israel cannot win this battle; it cannot even define what a victory might entail. Surely the battle is not about the tunnels or the militants’ underground operation, the tunnels are just weapons of resistance rather than the resistance itself. The Hamas and Gaza militants lured Israel into a battle zone in which it could never succeed and Hamas set the conditions, chose the ground and has written the terms required to conclude this cycle of violence.

What the TSA really thinks of you—as if you didn’t already know
By Lisa Simeone

It doesn’t take many brain cells to figure out that the TSA, institutionally and individually, holds us in contempt. In their eyes, we’re all potential terrorists. Also peons who have to be put in their place. Never mind that we pay their salaries, every penny of their $8-billion-a-year budget, and that they are supposed to facilitate flying, not impede it.

A discourse on isms and the principle of sharing
By Mohammed Mesbahi

The problems of humanity have reached such an apex that it is now critical for governments to implement the principle of sharing within and between every single country. It is critical on several counts: firstly, to release the joy and creativity that is inherent in every human being but widely suppressed through economic hardship and social breakdown, with levels of depression throughout the world now reaching epidemic proportions. Secondly, it is critical in a literal sense for the millions of men, women and children who live without adequate means for survival, and who are needlessly dying from poverty and disease with each passing day. Furthermore, it is vital that we integrate the principle of sharing into inter-governmental policies if we are to stand a chance of averting environmental catastrophe, for the necessary time for transforming our societies is fast running out. The world itself is sick and in a state of emergency, for which only sharing can provide the necessary healing and remedy. But on all these counts we are left in a quandary, because the crucial missing factor is a collective understanding that sharing is verily the solution to our problems, and our last remaining hope. Without an all-embracing public awareness that sharing is the only way out, it is impossible that this neglected principle can be implemented into world affairs.

Friday

Intimidation: Supporting genocide
By Dave Alpert

As more and more people are speaking out about Israel’s genocidal attacks against the Palestinian population in Gaza, mainstream media executives are trying to put a lid on it. How else can you explain NBC’s action to remove, from Gaza, Ayman Mohyeldin, an experienced, well respected reporter after he described the arbitrary killing of four young Palestinian boys playing soccer on a beach by members of the Israeli Defense Force.

BRICS’ time to act to counter US’s destabilization efforts
By Ben Tanosborn

It had to happen! The blame game on that horrendous airline incident, Malaysian Flight MH17, has reached the expected loud monotone of pointing fault, lock, stock and barrel at Russia … and, more specifically, to that villain ex-KGB Slav, Vladimir Putin.

Deep in the tell-tale heart of the Texas GOP
By Michael Winship

Imagine the official presentation of a worldview concocted by conspiracy theorists and an assortment of cranks and grumpy people. Conjure a document written by scribes possessed of poison pens soaked in the inkpots of Ayn Rand and the Brothers Grimm, caught in the grip of a dark dystopian fantasy of dragons and specters, in which everyone’s wrong but thee and me and we’re not sure of thee.

Freedom Rider: Putin in America’s crosshairs
By Margaret Kimberley

The chaos created by United States interventions is never ending and every act of aggression brings the world closer to mass conflict. As is always the case with its interference, the American effort to destabilize Russia has created unforeseen and dangerous consequences. Just as support for jihadists complicated the imperial project in Syria and Iraq, the United States’ instigated war between Russia and Ukraine has spiraled out of the West’s control.

Postcard from the end of America: Wolf Point, Montana
By Linh Dinh

It always amazes me how many people get on a train just to play cards, for outside their windows, a most amazing world is constantly unfurling. It doesn’t matter if it’s the Southwest Desert, Northern Plains, Cascades or Rocky Mountains, they don’t look up from their miserably dealt hands to notice that Eden is just a glass barrier away, but that’s how it is with the uber domesticated. They prefer a shrunken, airless civilization, as contained in 52 puny pieces of laminated cardboard, to the unscripted richness they’re entitled to at all times. Although it’s free, they don’t take it.

Week of July 14, 2014

Monday

Blatant Israeli propaganda blasting away on CNN
By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—On July 9, before making his obligatory trip to Jerusalem to cover the latest uneven Israeli-Palestinian military confrontation where Israeli “revenge killings” of innocent Palestinians is state policy, CNN Washington Bureau Chief Wolf Blitzer had an all-too-expected comment as he was seeing Israeli war planes bomb a crowded building in Gaza. Blitzer’s comment was, “Wow! Look at that!”

Washington’s arrogance will destroy its empire
Washington reeks of the stench of evil
By Paul Craig Roberts

Alone among the governments in the world, Washington requires sovereign governments to follow Washington’s laws even when Washington’s laws contradict the laws of sovereign countries.

Freedom Rider: Who prosecutes the prosecutors?
By Margaret Kimberley

Many Americans love to think that their country is the epitome of progress, democracy, and enlightenment. Millions of people will say that this is “the greatest country in the world.” These words are obviously born of ignorance and a belief in the superiority of the ultimate white settler state.

Burning alive in Gaza
By Missy Comley Beattie

With these words still hovering around his mouth, “We reject all cruel behavior,” Benjamin Netanyahu launched yet another attack with yet another movie title, Operation Protective Edge, on the hundreds of thousands of Palestinians who live in a state of siege and oppression in the Gaza Strip.

Jennifer Abel at Consumer Affairs on the TSA
By Lisa Simeone

Jennifer Abel is a freelance writer who’s been an eloquent—and scathing—TSA critic for years.

Tuesday

The World Cup fills with human interest as the number of Israeli attacks on Gaza go unheeded
By Jerry Mazza

I can’t even walk in the quiet of Riverside Park and sit on a bench with my wife without seeing a field of roided soccer players running about as if it were The World Cup games. We came to the park to catch the sunset-henge flashing its orange-gold brilliance in a beautiful sky over the Hudson River. Too soon the dusk descended like the dark night of merciless Israeli attacks on Gaza, presumably for Hamas shelling.

Netanyahu has shut the door on peace
By Linda S. Heard

There’s a photograph circulating in cyberspace of an official from the Palestinian National Authority (PNA), talking to Gaza’s Hamas chief, Esmail Haniyah, superimposed with imaginary bubbled conversation that says it all. “We have formed a unity government, the world is supporting us and turning against Israel and the IMF [International Monetary Fund] is funding us. What should we do next,” the PNA official asks? “We should kill three innocent teenagers to wreck our own government and allow Israel to bomb the crap out of us,” Haniyah answers.

Yankee blowback
By William Blum

The number of children attempting to cross the Mexican border into the United States has risen dramatically in the last five years: In fiscal year 2009 (October 1, 2009-September 30, 2010) about 6,000 unaccompanied minors were detained near the border. The US Department of Homeland Security estimates for the fiscal year 2014 the detention of as many as 74,000 unaccompanied minors.

Passing gas to the consumer
By Walter Brasch

Gas prices at the pump during the July 4th extended weekend were the highest they have been in six years. This, of course, has little to do with supply-and-demand economics. It has everything to do with supply-and-gouge profits.

The healing powers of lavender for burns and other minor injuries
By Bev Conover

The Kindle e-book “The Essential Burn Book for Baristas and Cooks,” co-authored by Sara S. DeHart and Kathleen M. Whalen, is a book essential to have in every home, restaurant, business or place where it is possible to suffer a first- or second-degree burn.

Wednesday

Putin rides high in Latin America as U.S. sanctions falter
By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—Russian President Vladimir Putin is visiting Brazil where he will participate in the 2014 summit of the BRICS nations of Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa held in the city of Fortaleza.

Once again, Israel is defeated

By Gilad Atzmon

As the Israeli Cabinet announced early yesterday that it accepted the Egyptian cease-fire offer, Palestinian freedom fighters in Gaza continued firing rockets targeting the whole of Israel.

And so the killing goes on
By Linda S. Heard

I’ve just seen a photograph of the sweetest tiny girl, a Palestinian child little more than a baby, hugging her dead father. I’ve watched televised footage of a distraught father clinging to his young daughter who’s missing half her head, screaming “Please wake up. I’ve brought you a toy.” There are so many children in Gaza now without mothers and fathers, and so many parents grieving the loss of their kids.

Nobody expects a Monty Python Fourth of July
A nostalgic London trip reminds that the power of money in politics corrupts both our democracies
By Michael Winship

For a very good reason, this year my girlfriend, Pat, and I were in London for the Fourth of July. The British feigned indifference to the anniversary of our breakaway, like disappointed parents choosing not to mention the unruly prodigal who dropped out, left home and, in spite of their warnings, did okay.

Shark attack!
By Philip A Farruggio

Remember the film “Jaws”? Remember how the whole town was affected by the presence of the predatory Great White? Well, all we working stiffs out there in America are just as terrorized by the multitude of sharks that run this country. We have the corporate sharks and their political ‘Two Party, One Party ‘shark allies who run our government. Either way, if you work for someone else or have a small mom and pop business … you are meat for these economic predators!

Thursday

Ravaging Gaza: The war Netanyahu cannot possibly win
By Ramzy Baroud

When the bodies of three Israeli settlers—Aftali Frenkel and Gilad Shaar, both 16, and Eyal Yifrach, 19—were found on June 30 near Hebron in the southern West Bank, Israel went into a state of mourning and a wave of sympathy flowed in from around the world. The three had disappeared 18 days earlier in circumstances that remain unclear.

FIVE EYES assault on social media
By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—The latest release of documents from the Ed Snowden cache reveal that the British Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), the National Security Agency’s British counterpart, has spearheaded the development of tools to manipulate, disrupt, and collect personal information from social media, including Facebook, PalTalk, and YouTube.

Snowden, a citizen of humanity’s hopeful world
By Ben Tanosborn

Don’t tag Edward Snowden as someone he does not want to be; for he is neither a hero, nor a traitor. He is, or should be, a proud citizen of an evolving hopeful world who has earned such citizenship not by right of birth, ethnic background or bloodlines, or by loyalty oath, but by a selfless personal contribution to the building of a positive, more humane world … where privacy and individual freedoms take precedence over the sad spectacle we are becoming in the United States: an electorate-collective of mindless consumerists, a Borg-like serving a warmongering, corporate power-elite.

Postcard from the end of America: Williston, North Dakota
By Linh Dinh

Oil made this America-dominated, futuristic world and with its increasing scarcity, will unravel it. Most pampered yet most disappointed, we’re living in the age of peak oil, water, gold, copper, wheat, rice, cabbage, porn, greed and banking shenanigans, etc., for with more mouths than ever going after a shrinking donut hole, the ugliness is just getting started, and let us not forget, this age of oil has also been an era of mass carnage, a century of resource wars that have wiped out hundreds of millions, but for the survivors, us grubby schmucks, what a cool ride, eh?

On how reality happens
By Richard John Stapleton

This article is an epiphany stimulated by Michael Adzema’s Funny God Facebook Post, January 14, 2014.

Friday

Did the other shoe just drop?
Black Rock and PIMCO sue banks for $250 billion
By Ellen Brown

For years, homeowners have been battling Wall Street in an attempt to recover some portion of their massive losses from the housing Ponzi scheme. But progress has been slow, as they have been outgunned and out-spent by the banking titans.

Strategy of killing civilians in Gaza and eastern Ukraine has same culprits
By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—The attack policy that the Israel Defense Force (IDF) has used in indiscriminately targeting civilians in Gaza mirrors the policy of the Ukrainian government in attacking civilians in eastern Ukraine. Moreover, the two operations, Israel’s “Protective Edge” and Ukraine’s “Anti-terrorist operation,” have something else in common. Both were developed by the same Zionist fascist elements who are calling the shots in Jerusalem and Kiev.

The Final Solution
By Dave Alpert

I’m certain that the title of this piece will cause some readers discomfort and anger. That’s good. It’s time for some discomfort. For too long, we have looked the other way in our unconditional support of Israel. Too many support Israel unconditionally, not because they’re right and not because their actions are justified but because they are Jews.

What I don’t like about life in the American police state
By John W. Whitehead

There’s a lot to love about America and its people: their pioneering spirit, their entrepreneurship, their ability to think outside the box, their passion for the arts, etc. Increasingly, however, as time goes by, I find the things I don’t like about living in a nation that has long since ceased to be a sanctuary for freedom are beginning to outnumber the things I love.

DHS keeping a list, checking it twice
By Lisa Simeone

It’s pretty common these days to have your resumé/curriculum vitae publicly available on a website. Most people use LinkedIn, which I can’t abide (it plunders your private email account, sends invitations without your knowledge to everybody under the sun to “link” to you, pretends to get you jobs, and other things not worth going into), so I use a site called Brand Yourself instead.

Week of July 7, 2014

Monday

Independence movement in southeastern Ukraine accuses Obama’s agents of slaughter
By Eric Zuesse

In the United States, there appears to be a virtual news blackout of what is happening in Ukraine and of why, and the following news-report breaks through it, so that the American public will know the situation that actually exists there.

Big, bigger and dumber
By Jerry Mazza

New York News 1 reports that Larry Silverstein, the builder of the Freedom Tower, the tallest building in New York, now wants to turn his deadly hand to building the tallest residential tower in lower New York, with room for over a thousand apartments space, malls and funeral parlors, just in case you’re not familiar with his work on the World Trade Center’s Building 7.

‘Bandar Bush’ is back calling the shots on ISIL’s advance through Iraq
By Wayne Madsen

Prince Bandar bin Sultan, the godfather behind the creation of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), now called the “Islamic State” or “Islamic Caliphate,” has returned to an influential position advising King Abdullah after being sacked as Saudi intelligence chief last April. Bandar’s new title is “adviser to the King and his special envoy.”

Pennsylvania Senate committee says pigeon shoots are animal cruelty
By Walter Brasch

HARRISBURG, Pa.—There is a remote possibility that Pennsylvania will finally ban the cruel practice of live pigeon shoots when the state Senate reconvenes in September. Pennsylvania is the last state where pigeon shoots are legally held.

Be afraid, be very afraid! TSA (and its ilk) to the rescue!
By Lisa Simeone

Well, I’m finally back from three weeks away. Judging by the lack of posts at TSA News, the civil liberties watchdog site I run, I guess it was a quiet time on the TSA front.

Tuesday

Islamic State in Iraq and Syria: Bin Laden won
By Eric Walberg

Osama Bin Laden’s goal in 9/11 was to suck the US into Afghanistan and Iraq, sparking a regional conflagration that would sweep away the imperial legacy and establish a new caliphate. Over a decade later, this plan is still on track. As he led his jihadists triumphantly into Mosul and declared an emirate on Iraq-Syrian territory, ISIS ‘caliph’ Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi announced that the 1916 secret Sykes-Picot Agreement between Britain, France and imperial Russia was at last being dismantled.

Pope Francis under physical threat from Vatican bankers; pontiff may have been poisoned
By Wayne Madsen

Like Pope John Paul I, Pope Francis is threatened by Vatican bankers keen on maintaining the Vatican’s status as an international money laundering center, according to information provided to WMR by sources deeply entrenched in daily Vatican operations.

Washington’s war crimes spread from Africa and the Middle East to Ukraine
By Paul Craig Roberts

A person might think that revulsion in “the world community” against Washington’s wanton slaughter of civilians in eight countries would have led to War Crimes Tribunal warrants issued for the arrest of presidents Clinton, Bush, Obama and many officials in their regimes. But the vocal part of “the world community”—the West—has become inured to Washington’s crimes against humanity and doesn’t bother to protest. Indeed, many of these governments are complicit in Washington’s crimes, and there could just as well be arrest warrants for members of European governments.

Revealed: ‘Collect It All’ NSA targets those seeking web privacy
'Merely visiting privacy-related websites is enough for a user's IP address to be logged into an NSA database,' says new report
By Jon Queally

Internet users who use online privacy tools or read certain websites may themselves become targets of NSA surveillance, according to a new investigation by public broadcasting outlets in Germany published on Thursday.

An eye for an eye
By Missy Comley Beattie

WTF? Israel shows no morality, no mercy, and no compassion for Palestinians. Israel’s strength is not a mystery. Their power is dependent on their belief that they are God’s Chosen, on sophisticated weaponry, US tax dollars, and bipartisan congressional support of Zionism that renders any “peace process” a charade.

Wednesday

Asset price inflation and inequality
By Ismael Hossein-zadeh

It is now common knowledge that the U.S. economy has, in recent years, been experiencing extremely uneven developments. While the financial sector has been enjoying enormously high rates of growth, the real sector is mired in stagnation or dismal growth rates. Accordingly, while the financial oligarchy is reaping the lion’s share of this fantastic growth of asset-price inflation, the overwhelming majority of citizens are suffering from the systematically declining standards of living.

The looming foreclosure crisis: As the Fed runs out of bullets, local governments are stepping in
By Ellen Brown

Former Assistant Treasury Secretary Paul Craig Roberts wrote last month that real US GDP growth for the first quarter of 2014 was a negative 2.9%, off by 5.5% from the positive 2.6% predicted by economists. If the second quarter also shows a decline, the US will officially be in recession. That means not only fiscal policy (government deficit spending) but monetary policy (unprecedented quantitative easing) will have failed. The Federal Reserve is out of bullets.

Virtual economy’s phantom job gains are based on statistical fraud
And more fraud is in the works
By Paul Craig Roberts

Washington can’t stop lying. Don’t be convinced by last Thursday’s job report that it is your fault if you don’t have a job. Those 288,000 jobs and 6.1% unemployment rate are more fiction than reality.

Affluence Economics: Low-inflation and “fool” employment
By Ben Tanosborn

Numbers don’t lie, the saying goes, but the have-liars are doing their numbers on the gullible have-nots. And although mathematics is an exact science, it can be used as a practical tool by inexact social scientists working for those trying to influence people at the civic or individual level, call it politics or more accurately, persuasive deceit.

The US Postal Service isn’t a dead letter
By Walter Brasch

Unless your life is centered upon an iPhone, an iPad, and an iEverything else, there is a possibility you may have actually bought a postage stamp, written a letter, and mailed it.

Thursday

The blundering Obama administration and its apparent incoherent foreign policy
By Rodrigue Tremblay

Am I alone in having the uneasy feeling, while listening to Barack Obama’s speeches, that we are witnessing an actor playing the role of an American president and carefully reading the script he has been given?

Arab-Israel conflict sinks to new depths
By Linda S. Heard

The murder of three Israeli teenagers was horrifying but the Israeli government’s response is equally so. Two suspects—allegedly members of Hamas—who disappeared from their homes, had been effectively pronounced guilty before an investigation was concluded, let alone a trial. Israel’s revenge was swift. Homes were demolished and over 420 Palestinians were arrested, many with no affiliation to the group.

Chomsky, BDS and the Jewish left paradigm
By Gilad Atzmon

In his latest article in The Nation, Noam Chomsky selectively cherry picks the facts that fit his preferred narrative, while ignoring and disguising relevant details that contradict his thesis. One would expect an academic of Chomsky’s stature to perform at a much higher standard of intellectual integrity.

The higher morality of reproductive choice
By Dennis Rahkonen

Abortions are often necessary, and only each female, in her own unique circumstance, can determine what constitutes a legitimate abortion need. No one has the defensible authority to second-guess or demonize any woman who arrives at that conclusion.

The Emperor’s New Clothes: The naked truth about the American police state
By John W. Whitehead

It’s vogue, trendy and appropriate to look to dystopian literature as a harbinger of what we’re experiencing at the hands of the government. Certainly, George Orwell’s 1984 and Animal Farm have much to say about government tyranny, corruption, and control, as does Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and Philip K. Dick’s Minority Report. Yet there are also older, simpler, more timeless stories—folk tales and fairy tales—that speak just as powerfully to the follies and foibles in our nature as citizens and rulers alike that give rise to tyrants and dictatorships.

Friday

Targeted killings, the laws of war, and the Justice Department memo
By Howard Lisnoff

Reading the memo in which the U.S. government rationalizes the targeted killing of Anwar al-Awlaki is something akin to reading the melding of “Alice In Wonderland: and “1984.”

The deteriorating economic outlook
By Paul Craig Roberts, Dave Kranzler and John Williams

The third and final estimate (until the annual GDP revisions) of first quarter 2014 real GDP growth released June 25 by the US Bureau of Economic Analysis was a 2.9% contraction in GDP growth, a 5.5 percentage point difference from the January forecast of 2.6% growth. Apparently, the first quarter contraction was dismissed by those speculating in equities as weather related, as stock averages rose with the bad news.

Obama’s failure and Richard Perle’s whitewashing of the Iraq war
By Ramzy Baroud

As Iraq stands on the verge of a complete breakdown into mini sectarian states, former leading neoconservative and Iraq war advocate Richard Perle has chimed in on the situation on Newsmax TV. His statements in an interview given on Saturday were yet another testimony to the intellectual degeneration of a group that had once promised a ‘new Middle East,’ only to destabilize the region with violent consequences that continue to reverberate until this day.

‘Jane Doe’ raped by CBP and hospital personnel settles part of lawsuit
By Lisa Simeone

The case of a woman who was raped—repeatedly—by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers and by medical personnel at the University Medical Center of El Paso has been partially settled.

Am I here?
By Jerry Mazza

Do you ever get the feeling that you’re not here, you’re walking in a dream? But what is here, now, and tangible you think. Is it an unmanageable world of violent yahoos that you see on Russia Today TV tearing themselves apart, here, there and everywhere? What is here but your inner voice that turns your head like a tank top and fires into a crowd? The jolt wakes you up. You recognize you’re in your bedroom. You think this is only your own personal narrative. Perhaps it is. You’ve become a zombie with a passport to cross into all states of mind and, dare I say, being like Jerzy Kosiński.

Week of June 30, 2014

Monday

The effect of language

By Dave Alpert

Pro-life: This is an interesting term for anti-abortionists to use. Is there anyone out there who is not pro-life? Or, another way to put it, who is against life? Life is like motherhood and apple pie, we all are for it.

Cold War renewed with a vengeance while Washington again lies

By Paul Craig Roberts

The Cold War made a lot of money for the military/security complex for four decades dating from Churchill’s March 5, 1946, speech in Fulton, Missouri, declaring a Soviet “Iron Curtain” until Reagan and Gorbachev ended the Cold War in the late 1980s. During the Cold War Americans heard endlessly about “the Captive Nations.” The Captive Nations were the Baltics and the Soviet bloc, usually summarized as “Eastern Europe.”

Learning from Lawrence of Arabia

By Bill Moyers and Michael Winship

As fears grow of a widening war across the Middle East, fed by reports that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) envisions a region-wide, all controlling theocracy, we found ourselves talking about another war. The Great War—or World War I, as it would come to be called — was triggered one hundred years ago this month when an assassin shot and killed Austria’s Archduke Ferdinand in Sarajevo. Through a series of tangled alliances and a cascade of misunderstandings and blunders, that single act of violence brought on a bloody catastrophe. More than 37 million people were killed or wounded.

The neocons are back!

By Wayne Madsen

Like proverbial “bad pennies,” many of the leading neoconservative architects of America’s failed interventions in Iraq and Afghanistan are being hauled back in front of television news cameras to comment on the current predicament that Washington finds itself in with a surging “Al Qaeda” spinoff attempting to seize control of eastern Syria and western and northern Iraq and transform the area into a radical Islamic “caliphate.”

The 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

By Gary G. Kohls, MD

June 28, 2014, was the 100th anniversary of the infamous political assassination in Sarajevo, Bosnia, that was the spark that started World War I, the war that was widely called “The War to End All Wars,” because of the unendurable mutual mass slaughter of an entire generation of young European men (on all sides of the war).

Tuesday

The Supremes have bestowed religious rights on privately held for-profit corporations
By Bev Conover

In its 5-4 decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc., et al., handed down yesterday, the US Supreme Court reaffirmed the madness that has overtaken America, the war on women is very much alive and the secular nation the framers of the constitution established is now in its death throes.

A world not yet free from divinely-inspired jurisprudence
By Ben Tanosborn

Whether it is an original curse we inherit, a spiritual instruction in our DNA, or perhaps just a learned acquisition made during our formative years, the malediction “thou shalt not have peace” seems to be encrusted in our being until we cease to exist; until the soul finally escapes the body, in either transformative or symbolic state. Or at least, that appears to be the fate of the religious western man. Not that we are exempting eastern religions from the same malady we have in the west.

Is the U.S. beef supply really free of mad cow disease?
By Martha Rosenberg

When the first U.S. mad cow was found in late 2003, 98 percent of U.S. beef exports evaporated overnight. There was such national revulsion to cow “cannibalism” when described in the late 1990s as the presumed cause of the fatal disease, Oprah Winfrey said she would never eat a hamburger again and was promptly sued by Texas cattle producers. They lost.

Boycott the vote
By Missy Comley Beattie

Go to dictionary.com and enter—never mind. Just click this to see a new synonym for voting, the word juggernaut.

For sale: Personal brands & commodity lives
By Frank Scott

Modern marketing changes language and machinery but not its material foundation, which existed long before the industrial age. An allegedly “new” economy of information technology—IT—is just an update with different jargon and tools but the profit and loss substance remain exactly what they’ve always been: great for some, nice for many, and terrible for the earth and most of its people.

Wednesday

The creation of a Jewish state
By Dave Alpert

Israel’s independence in 1948 was marked by the massive migration of Jews from Europe and the Muslim countries to Israel. While hundreds of thousands of Jews were entering the area, hundreds of thousands of Palestinians were forced to leave.

New Vioxx harm revealed: non-healing of bone after fractures and surgery
By Martha Rosenberg

It has been a decade since Merck’s “super-aspirin” Vioxx was withdrawn from the market after a study showed it doubled the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Heavily advertised by celebrity athletes like Dorothy Hamill and Bruce Jenner and used by approximately 20 million patients, estimates of the heart attacks caused by Vioxx range from 27,000 to up to 140,000.

Narrative on jailing of journalists one-sided
By Linda S. Heard

Al Jazeera’s campaign to pressure Egypt into releasing three of its employees has been successful in as much as it has kept their plight alive and galvanised its media colleagues and western politicians. But it has not had an impact on the people who matter most — judges who delivered seven and ten-year sentences. And neither has it strong-armed President Abdul Fattah Al Sissi to interfere in the judicial process.

Remembering my encounter with Fred Phelps
By Mary Shaw

As LGBT Pride Month wound down, I was thinking about my encounter awhile back with the now-deceased “Reverend” Fred Phelps, then head of the homophobic Kansas-based Westboro Baptist “Church,” whose website can be found at GodHatesFags.com. Yes, that is their actual web address.

Dreaming life?
By Philip A Farruggio

In Adrian Lyne’s 1990 film Jacob’s Ladder what appears to be one man’s reality is nothing more than a dream … Horrible, twisted and strange. Can this be what is going on with all of us? The great Hindu sage Yogananda taught the eastern precept that this thing we call reality is nothing but a great dramatic dream that the higher part of our consciousness is having. We all are the writers, actors and directors of it. My friend Jay tells me that this is nonsense. He, being a man of utter truth and fact, feels that for the entire population of this planet to be having the same dream of reality must mean that this all is real. Who then is correct?

Thursday

BC land claim ruling: Canada’s Keystone Cop stumbles
By Eric Walberg

On June 16, Prime Minister Stephen Harper officially approved Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline project to the Pacific coast to export tar sands oil, just days before Canada’s Supreme Court wrapped up its deliberations on the Tsilhqot’in Nation land claim. Coincidence? Or attempted arm twisting?

Isn’t it time for Arabs to unite?
By Linda S. Heard

On June 22, in reference to the crisis in Iraq, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said: “When your enemies are fighting each other, don’t strengthen either one of them, weaken both.” Every Arab conflict is in Israel’s interest was expressed by Oded Yinon, an Israeli journalist attached to the Foreign Ministry, in a 1982 paper, titled “A Strategy for Israel in the Nineteen-Eighties.”

How DC’s political intelligence biz made fat cats fatter
By Michael Winship

Looking over the last few weeks of news, if you would seek a single headline that sums up the Hulk-like grip in which corporate America holds the US Congress, this might be it: “Eric Cantor’s Loss a Blow to Wall Street.”

238 years later, would Americans still choose freedom over slavery?
By John W. Whitehead

Imagine living in a country where armed soldiers crash through doors to arrest and imprison citizens merely for criticizing government officials. Imagine that in this very same country, you’re watched all the time, and if you look even a little bit suspicious, the police stop and frisk you or pull you over to search you on the off chance you’re doing something illegal. Keep in mind that if you have a firearm of any kind while in this country, it may get you arrested and, in some circumstances, shot by police.

I found my thrill on Wave Hill
By Jerry Mazza

First, forgive me Fats Domino for parodying your great tune’s title, but I found my thrill on Wave Hill in the Riverdale section of the Bronx, New York, during a period of extended unemployment. I returned to it over and over again to escape from my Upper West Side residence. My initial impression was that I had found heaven on earth—sweeping acres of impeccably landscaped grass and flowers, that rolled down to, believe it or not, a train rail. Discovered the mansion on it had been provided for people like Arturo Toscanini.

Friday

Trying to feel patriotic on the Fourth of July
By Gary G. Kohls, MD

Since the assassinations of Jack Kennedy and Martin Luther King (and the Vietnam War that had much to do with both), it has been hard for historically-literate and open-minded Americans to generate much patriotic fervor on the Fourth of July. But they should have been skeptical long before those idealism-shattering events.

ISIS and the Taliban: Writing on the wall for Afghanistan
By Eric Walberg

Afghans sleepwalked to the polls to replace Karzai, with a choice between a US-educated ex-World Bank official, Ashraf Ghani (and his warlord VP Dostum), or the Tajik Abdullah Abdullah who threatens chaos if he loses.

Freedom Rider: Democrats also to blame for SCOTUS rulings
By Margaret Kimberley

June 30, 2014, will go down in history as a day when two truly horrendous Supreme Court decisions were handed down. Both cases will have lasting and devastating impacts on Americans but the Republican right wing is not solely to blame for the damage done.

Ramadan, socialism and the neighbour’s beat-up car
By Ramzy Baroud

For those who spent childhoods in Gaza, the spiritual month of abstinence provokes reflection on how it enabled Palestinians to uncover the collective strength of their beleaguered community.

How to create the ideal government and society
By Roger Copple

This article is not specifically about the exploited working class, the disappearing middle class, or the still-controlling ruling class. Instead, it is about describing how local, state, and the national governments can be improved, preferably under a new national constitution. It is not just about government; it expresses my worldview on several topics.

Week of July 23, 2014

Monday

Redrawing of the map begins with destruction of Iraq
Larry Chin

Is Iraq being suddenly invaded by waves of “terrorists”? Or has Iraq been deliberately sabotaged, sacrificed, and destroyed?

Professor Francis Boyle on impeachment of Bush and Obama
By Paul Craig Roberts

As Democratic Representative Nancy Pelosi, the Richest Representative of the One Percent in the House of Representatives, said: “Impeachment is off the table.” Nevertheless, Insouciant Californians still send The bought-and paid-for hireling to Washington.

The disappearance
By Dave Alpert

It’s been difficult for me to keep quiet about the disappearance of the three Israeli adolescents over a week ago. I’ve been accused of seeing conspiracies everywhere and that may be true, but governments lie and governments manipulate and cheat and too often we accept what they say at face value.

The warfare state of capital
By Frank Scott

The destruction of Iraq, which began under the conservatively emotional Bush regime, continues under the liberally placid Obama administration. There are differences in style when an intelligent landscaper replaces a slack jawed gardener but the plantation they serve differs only in the cosmetic facade it sells the public, not the diseased crop it produces.

In whose national interest?
By Missy Comley Beattie

For several days, I’ve read, written, deleted, read more, written more, deleted. I confess. I don’t know exactly what the hell is going on in Iraq except that this War of Terror is an epic clusterfuck and that the US armed Syrian jihadis who now have entered Iraq to join Sunni extremists in slaughtering Shi’ites.

Tuesday

Buying up the planet: Out-of-control central banks are on a corporate buying spree
By Ellen Brown

When the US Federal Reserve bought an 80% stake in American International Group (AIG) in September 2008, the unprecedented $85 billion outlay was justified as necessary to bail out the world’s largest insurance company. Today, however, central banks are on a global corporate buying spree not to bail out bankrupt corporations but simply as an investment, to compensate for the loss of bond income due to record low interest rates. Indeed, central banks have become some of the world’s largest stock investors.

IRAQ, ISIS, and intervention: Just what is going on?
By John Chuckman

As so often is the case in foreign affairs, we will never know with precision what is happening in Iraq. The governments involved have reasons to disguise what they are doing, and a number of governments are indeed at work there.

Scientists predict increased rain, floods for Northeast
By Walter Brasch

Residents of New England and the Mid-Atlantic states will experience increased rainfall and floods if data analysis by a Penn State meteorologist and long-term projections by a fisheries biologist, with a specialty in surface water pollution, are accurate.

The gambler: Knowing when to discard aces and kings
By Ben Tanosborn

Wednesday, June 18, 2014, will become yet another unmemorable day in Spain’s history of great debacles: a latter day demonstration of how things are thought to change while remaining the same. What happened in/to Spain this grim day in politics (monarchical continuation) and sports (football humiliation) defines both a nation (a people) lacking vision, and definitely lacking sociopolitical wisdom and leadership.

Homage to the old soldier
By Jerry Mazza

If scenes of Normandy at war and peace can be called beautiful in any way, it’s in the contrast of the locales from today to 70 years ago

Wednesday

Rockin’ in Russia, Murti-Bing Pills in America
By John Stanton

Imagine the feeling an American might get listening at peak volume to Queen’s “We are the Champions and We will Rock You” while driving down the main street of Sevastopol, Crimea—Federation of Russia—home to the headquarters of the Russian Black Sea flotilla. More on that later.

Iraqi hydrocarbon prize of U.S. invasion in danger
By Nicola Nasser

Excluding “boots on the ground” and leaving combat missions to local and regional “partners,” President Barak Obama and his administration say the United States keeps “all options on the table” to respond militarily to the terrorists’ threat to “American interests” in Iraq, which are now in “danger.”

Too much analysis brings paralysis
By Linda S. Heard

The self-ascribed Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) has swept through northern Iraq like a bulldozer on speed and is currently just 60 kilometers from the capital Baghdad. Moreover, it has captured the Al-Qaim crossing permitting the group an unfettered access to its cohorts in Syria. And what is the international community doing in the face of Iraq’s imminent collapse? Precisely nothing!

The U.S. Supreme Court is marching in lockstep with the police state
By John W. Whitehead

The U.S. Supreme Court was intended to be an institution established to intervene and protect the people against the government and its agents when they overstep their bounds. Yet as I point out in my book A Government of Wolves: The Emerging American Police State, Americans can no longer rely on the courts to mete out justice. In the police state being erected around us, the police and other government agents can probe, poke, pinch, Taser, search, seize, strip and generally manhandle anyone they see fit in almost any circumstance, all with the general blessing of the courts.

The myth versus the reality of Israel
By Jim Miles

This is a powerfully written unsettling work that relates the story of Israel from the perspective of how ideas are changed and manipulated for the benefit of the state. Unfortunately the majority of citizens of most countries are susceptible to the ideation/ideology of the mainstream of political thought as it is supported by the mainstream press. In the case of Israel, image and ideation, its narrative and ideology, are of paramount importance for the survival of the state beyond its military strength and relatively successful integration into the globalized corporate governed world.

Thursday

Can Putin’s diplomacy prevail over Washington’s coercion?
By Paul Craig Roberts

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin is trying to save the world from war. We should all help him.

‘Trojan Horse’ scandal has opened Cameron’s eyes
By Linda S. Heard

Britain’s adherence to political correctness has created a potential enemy within. The majority of the country’s estimated 3.5 million Muslims have struck a successful balance between embracing social norms, enhancing the United Kingdom’s multi-cultural fabric and retaining their Islamic identity. That said, a small minority of Islamist radicals, often with the shrill support of leftist politicians and media, are cultivating extremist politicised views.

Freedom Rider: Detroit and Iraq
By Margaret Kimberley

The ugly face of empire and disaster capitalism is visible all over the world. Detroit, Michigan, was once a thriving city but was sent into a tailspin by the deindustrialization of the United States, white flight, and institutional racism which blamed black people who were in fact the victims of catastrophe. The coup de grace was delivered by big banks like UBS, Bank of America and Barclays, which sold risky derivatives schemes to corrupt Detroit politicians. When the financial deal inevitably headed south, the banks were the creditors first in line for a payout.

WikiLeaked doc reveals Wall Street plan for global financial deregulation
WikiLeaks releases draft text of trade deal exposing efforts to increase stranglehold over global economy
By Jon Queally

WikiLeaks published a previously tightly-held and secretive draft of a trade document last Thursday that, if enacted, would give the world’s financial powers an even more dominant position to control the global economy by avoiding regulations and public accountability.

Global economic sharing: the most important debate of our time?
By STWR

The implications of moving towards a global sharing economy are immense, but there are many reasons to embrace this simple concept—which is far more radical and urgent than it may at first seem. As a primer from STWR makes clear, the necessity of sharing the world’s resources is central to the most critical issues that face humanity in the 21st century.

Friday

United States Supreme Court gives anti-abortionists license to harass women outside clinics
By Bev Conover

How would you feel if you went to buy some beer or wine for a party and encountered a group of strangers blocking the entrance to a liquor store and shouting about the evils of alcohol and when you tried to walk around or through them, they kept blocking your way, telling you that beer and wine are the work of the devil and they are trying to save you from his clutches? More than likely, you would be inclined to call the police, as risky as that can be these days.

A new recession and a new world devoid of Washington’s arrogance?
By Paul Craig Roberts

A final number for real US GDP growth in the first quarter of 2014 was released Wednesday. The number is not the 2.6% growth rate predicted by the know-nothing economists in January of this year. The number is a decline in GDP of -2.9 percent.

From the pages of Orwell and ‘1984’: Irregular warfare against Eurasia
By Wayne Madsen

“Oceania was at war with Eurasia: therefore Oceania had always been at war with Eurasia. The enemy of the moment always represented absolute evil, and it followed that any past or future agreement with him was impossible.” These are the words from “1984,” George Orwell’s fictional novel and eerily correct prognostication of future events from geopolitics to the loss of privacy and the rise of the surveillance state.

Reverting to the Ummah: Who is the ‘Angry Muslim’ and why
By Ramzy Baroud

“Brother, brother,” a young man called on me as I hurriedly left a lecture hall in some community center in Durban, South Africa. This happened at the height of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars, when all efforts at stopping the ferocious US-Western military drives against these two countries terribly failed.

Little League on a sunny day in Prospect Park
By Jerry Mazza

There he came, my five-and-a-half-year-old grandson Joseph, number eight, crossing home plate on the condensed diamond of one of Prospect Park’s giant meadows. The first iPhone snapshot of the day. This takes place under robin’s egg blue skies that turn to gray clouds, then showers and blue skies again. This as the cheers of my son-in-law, Jonathan, my daughter, Stephanie, my wife and I spur Joseph on. The kid is a natural. Swings a fast bat into the ball, drops the bat and runs to first, rounds it to second, third then home.

Week of June 16, 2014

Monday

Fukushima’s children are dying
By Harvey Wasserman

Some 39 months after the multiple explosions at Fukushima, thyroid cancer rates among nearby children have skyrocketed to more than forty times (40x) normal.

The people struggle to find and retain representation
By Paul Craig Roberts

Dave Brat, a professor of economics at Virginia’s Randolph-Macon College, is a marked man. Professor Brat defeated Republican House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, a prime trophy of the Israel Lobby. I doubt that Eric Cantor ever lost an opportunity to place Israel’s interests above the interests of his constituents. Under US laws, Cantor should have been required to register as a foreign agent.

Would you have the guts to out your father on HBO?
By Jerry Mazza

If you were Robert De Niro you would. You would have known from the time you were a kid, when he left the house and your mother to paint and you would have already read in his notebooks that he was troubled by his homosexuality and hapless search for love. Nevertheless, being the international film star you are, you would have felt the need to share his pain and yours and let people know. A lesser man would have kept his father in the closet, like a ghost, until it tore him apart. But not De Niro.

America’s enthusiasm for the status quo
By Wayne Madsen

The French have a saying that sums up the foreign policy of the United States: “Plus ça change, plus c’est la meme chose”—”the more things change, the more they stay the same.” Nothing exemplified America’s enthusiasm for the status quo more than President Obama’s appearance at a news conference alongside British Prime Minister David Cameron prior to the 70th anniversary commemoration of D-Day held the next day in France.

Purity balls: bad vibes and chastity
By Missy Comley Beattie

I need to come clean after reading an article, “Striking Portraits of Fathers and the Daughters Whose Virginity They’ve Pledged to Protect,” that abutted a memory—one sending me on an expedition, opening boxes, to find the baby book my mother wrote in until I was 20.

Tuesday

Genocide, great wars, and other human depravity
By John Chuckman

The word genocide, coined in 1944 in an effort to describe what the Nazis called “the Final Solution” and what today we call the Holocaust, attempted to distinguish the crime of killing people of a certain identity in such great numbers that you tried eliminating them as a group. Earlier in that century, there had been the mass murder of Armenians by the Turks, an event Hitler once cynically reminded associates was not even remembered only a few decades later.

Is ISIL in Iraq a gun-for-hire?
By Linda S. Heard

Iraq’s Prime Minister Nouri Al Maliki was taken by surprise, even though he was warned time-and-time again about the perils of neglecting the Sunni community and shutting Sunnis out of government—or was he? How on earth was a ragtag bunch of 800–1,000 terrorists capable of taking over Iraq’s second largest city, Mosul, home to almost two million people, with such swiftness and ease? Why did government troops and police simply remove their uniforms and walk off into the sunset without putting up a fight? And why wouldn’t parliamentarians form a quorum to impose emergency laws when this situation is the biggest emergency since 2003? Curiously, a senior commander in Saddam Hussain’s military was released from jail to supervise the fightback.

Washington’s Iraq ‘victory’
By Paul Craig Roberts

The citizens of the United States still do not know why their government destroyed Iraq. “National Security” will prevent them from ever knowing. “National Security” is the cloak behind which hides the crimes of the US government.

Missing Saddam
By Wayne Madsen

The neoconservatives who have driven the foreign policies of Barack Obama and his predecessor, George W. Bush, have seen their plans for total disruption of the Middle East come to fruition. It was the neocons’ insatiable desire to eliminate every Arab populist socialist government that now has a breakaway faction of Al Qaeda, assisted by former members of Saddam Hussein’s Republican Guard, seizing Mosul and Tikrit and is now within marching distance of Baghdad. In January, the Iraqi jihadists seized control of Fallujah, the site of one of the bloodiest battles during the U.S. invasion of Iraq.

Food lobby colossus sues Vermont over GMO ‘right to know’
Powerful lobbyist groups claim ‘free speech’ as they file suit against law that says consumers should know what’s in their food

By Jon Queally

Vermont’s Attorney General William Sorrellon has said his office is ready for a “heck of a fight” after some of the most powerful members of the nation’s food industry filed suit on Thursday challenging the state’s new law that requires the labeling of packaged food containing genetically modified (GMO) ingredients.

Wednesday

Antagonizing Palestinians, Australia lobs linguistic blunder snowballs
By Nicola Nasser

Reacting to antagonized Palestinian snowballing protests to her government’s decision on June 5 to reverse a 47-year-old bipartisan consensus on describing eastern Jerusalem as “occupied,” Foreign Minister Julie Bishop on June 13 denied any “change in the Australian government’s position.”

Connecting the dots
By Linda S. Heard

If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, then it is a duck was one of former US Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld’s favorite sayings in 2003 when Shock and Awe turned the Iraqi capital into a ball of flame. But just as he was wrong about Saddam’s nuclear weapons that were destroyed in the early 1990s, those who are jumping to conclusions about the situation now could be misguided.

Has the Dept. of Homeland Security become America’s standing army?
By John W. Whitehead

If the United States is a police state, then the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is its national police force, with all the brutality, ineptitude and corruption such a role implies. In fact, although the DHS’ governmental bureaucracy may at times appear to be inept and bungling, it is ruthlessly efficient when it comes to building what the Founders feared most—a standing army on American soil.

The Jewish plan for the Middle East and beyond
By Gilad Atzmon

Surely, what’s happening now in Iraq and Syria must serve as a final wakeup call that we have been led into a horrific situation in the Middle East by a powerful lobby driven by the interests of one tribe and one tribe alone.

Negative view of Israel is increasing
By Jim Miles

With the peace talks being dead, what happens in Israel/Palestine? Settlements will continue to be built, dispossession will continue against Palestinians, slowly the “apartheid” context of Israel will become more and more obvious.

Thursday

Comcast-Time Warner Cable deal is bad news for the public
By Jerry Mazza

I got the news from my last Time-Warner bill, which is for a 42-inch flat screen and a second set, 23- x 36-inch flat screen. It seems they are changing all the numbers of the stations, introducing content previously shown over a period of years and still changing. I took notes when I talked to the representative about a monthly bill from TW for $142.25. RT-Today, my favorite news station at Channel 135 hadn’t been there for weeks.

Sectarian monster reawakened: Redrawing the map of Iraq, again
By Ramzy Baroud

“Labeiki ya Zaynab,” chanted Iraqi Shia fighters as they swayed, dancing with their rifles before TV news cameras in Baghdad on June 13. They were apparently getting ready for a difficult fight ahead. For them, it seemed that a suitable war chant would be answering the call of Zaynab, the daughter of Imam Ali, the great Muslim Caliph who lived in Medina 14 centuries ago. That was the period through which the Shia sect slowly emerged, based on a political dispute whose consequences are still felt to this day.

Washington is beating the war drums
By Paul Craig Roberts

I wish I had only good news to bring to readers, or even one item of good news. Alas, goodness has ceased to be a feature of US policy and simply cannot be found in any words or deeds emanating from Washington or the capitals of its European vassal states. The Western World has succumbed to evil.

Iraq, America and the lobby
By Gilad Atzmon

It is amusing to witness the energy and effort mainstream news outlets are investing in diverting attention from the fact that the current mess in Iraq is the direct outcome of Jewish political domination of the West for the last two decades.

Who is behind the opioid epidemic?
By Martha Rosenberg

There is good news and bad news when it comes to the nation’s decade-long opioid/heroin addiction epidemic.

Friday

‘The Phoenix has landed’: What you need to know to fight for the survival of American democracy and your own
By Luciana Bohne

‘The Phoenix Program: America’s Use of Terror in Vietnam,’ by Douglas Valentine, was first published in 1990 and reprinted in 2000. In his introduction in 2000, Valentine described Phoenix: “This book is about terror and its role in political warfare. It will show how, as successive American governments sink deeper and deeper into the vortex of covert operations—ostensibly to combat terrorism and Communist insurgencies—the American people gradually lose touch with the democratic ideals that once defined their national self-concept. This book asks what happens when Phoenix comes home to roost.”

The World Cup and ‘Brazil’s Dance with the Devil’
By Michael Winship

Here in polyglot New York, pop into any bar, restaurant or even dry cleaner and chances are there’s a TV set tuned to the World Cup. And Monday’s surprise United States victory over rival Ghana—the cheers when the US scored the winning goal rocked my neighborhood—has increased attention even more. The fever has taken hold in our city as it has around the planet, with hundreds of millions watching the soccer—football—action from Brazil, this year’s host country.

Freedom Rider: America’s war crime in Iraq
By Margaret Kimberley

Beginning in 1991, the United States government brought what has become a never ending hell to Iraq. President George H.W. Bush’s war that year was followed by devastating sanctions which were continued by presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. It was bad enough that 500,000 children died because of shortages of food and medicine but, in 2003, Bush the younger and his henchmen and women rolled the dice on invasion and an occupation that lasted for more than ten years. The Project for a New American Century, the 21st century version of Manifest Destiny, demanded a Pax Americana which set out to make the United States the master of the world.

Freedom Summer 50 years on
By Dennis Rahkonen

It’s been half a century since Freedom Summer civil rights activists Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney vanished in rural Mississippi, triggering a long search by the FBI to find them and determine exactly what happened.

TSA comedy carnival at LAX
By Lisa Simeone

You know the line: “Laugh and the whole world laughs with you”? Well, the TSA in Los Angeles has taken it to heart.

Week of June 9, 2014

Monday

A question of torture

By Luciana Bohne

U.S. District Court Judge Gladys Kessler’s ruling in May to suspend the force-feeding of Abu Wa’el Dhiab, a Guantanamo prisoner from Syria, was called “unprecedented” in the media. The ruling halted the prisoner’s forced removal from his cell (called “forcible cell extraction”) in order to be strapped down in a painful, though, state-of-the art, restraint chair. Through a tube inserted in his nose to his stomach, he would then be fed. She ordered one hundred videos of this vicious procedure on this single prisoner “to be preserved” until the next hearing.

Interest rate puzzle

By Paul Craig Roberts and Dave Kranzler

One of the biggest puzzles in the financial markets this year has been the considerable fall in interest rates, despite the Fed’s program of tapering or cutting back the Fed’s bond purchases known as Quantitative Easing. A year ago, when Fed Chairman Bernanke announced the possibility of tapering QE on May 22, 2013, the 10-year Treasury yield was 2.03%. The yield quickly moved up close to 3% after Bernanke’s taper comments, forcing the Fed to retract or “clarify” them. Since January 2014, however, when the Fed actually began tapering, the 10-year yield has steadily declined from over 3% to it’s current yield of just over 2.5%.

More questions than answers in Brussels museum shooting

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—Although French police continue to detain Mehdi Nemmouche, a French national who recently returned to France from Syria, there are more questions than answers in a shooting that WMR originally reported has all the markings of a false flag attack. Nemmouche is accused of killing an Israeli couple, a French volunteer, and a Belgian museum employee in the museum attack that came just prior to the European Parliament elections. Nemmouche is being held by French police for allegedly being found in possession of weapons, a large amount of ammunition, and a video claiming responsibility for the Brussels museum attack.

Edward Snowden is upset with the snooping but not the system?

By William Blum

Is Edward Snowden a radical? The dictionary defines a radical as “an advocate of political and social revolution,” the adjective form being “favoring or resulting in extreme or revolutionary changes.” That doesn’t sound like Snowden as far as what has been publicly revealed. In common usage, the term “radical” usually connotes someone or something that goes beyond the generally accepted boundaries of socio-political thought and policies; often used by the Left simply to denote more extreme than, or to the left of, a “liberal.”

Junked Rapiscan scanners get second life

By Lisa Simeone

Since the radiation-emitting, independently untested Rapiscan strip-search scanners were removed from airports last year—at the cost of millions of dollars to taxpayers—what’s happened to them?

Tuesday

California’s Top-Two Primary eliminates third-party rivals

By Ellen Brown

Primary elections originated in the American progressive movement and were intended to take the power of candidate nomination away from party leaders and deliver it to the people. California’s Top Two Primary takes power away from those third parties representing the 99% and delivers it to the 1%.

The lies grow more audacious

By Paul Craig Roberts

If there were any doubts that Western “leaders” live in a fantasy make-believe world constructed out of their own lies, the G-7 meeting and 70th anniversary celebration of the Normandy landing dispelled the doubts.

Who is more exceptional: the United States or Russia?

By William Blum

I was going to write a commentary about President Obama’s speech to the graduating class at the US Military Academy (West Point) on May 28. When he speaks to a military audience the president is usually at his most nationalistic, jingoist, militaristic, and American-exceptionalist—wall-to-wall platitudes. But this talk was simply TOO nationalistic, jingoist, militaristic, and American-exceptionalist. (“I believe in American exceptionalism with every fiber of my being.”) To go through it line by line in order to make my usual wise-ass remarks, would have been just too painful. However, if you’re in a masochistic mood and wish to read it, it can be found here.

Freedom Rider: Miners shot down

By Margaret Kimberley

Before August 16, 2012, the town of Marikana was little known outside of South Africa. On that day it entered the lexicon as a place of infamy where 34 striking platinum miners were shot dead by police. The massacre at Marikana left no doubt that black South Africans had been sold out by the African National Congress and its leaders, including Nelson Mandela.

Global justice, sustainability and the sharing economy

By Rajesh Makwana

If the sharing economy movement is to play a role in shifting society away from the dominant economic paradigm, it will have to get political. And this means guarding against the co-optation of sharing by the corporate sector, while joining forces with a much larger body of activists that have long been calling—either explicitly or implicitly—for more transformative and fundamental forms of economic sharing across the world.

Wednesday

WW III: More interclass than international

By Ismael Hossein-zadeh

Most pundits of historical developments tend to perceive another global war, often called WW III, in a manner similar to World Wars I and II; that is, large scale deployment of military means in pursuit of defeat, destruction or subjugation of contending opponents. While prospects of such an ominous scenario certainly cannot be ruled out, there is reason to believe, however, that the much talked-about WW III may be of a different type: more interclass than international.

Ice Station Obama

By Wayne Madsen

Although President Obama’s “pivot to Asia” is receiving media attention, his little-known push to establish American hegemony over the rapidly melting Arctic polar zone has gone largely unnoticed.

More phantom jobs created—all in the wrong places

Education is not the answer

By Paul Craig Roberts

Last April, I saw a report that 83% of May’s college graduates did not have a job. I remarked that in my day most of us had 2 or 3 job or graduate school offers before we graduated. The latest payroll jobs report issued on June 6 proves that the April report was true.

An assault upon our civility

By Walter Brasch

For awhile, it appeared the NRA leadership committed an act of sanity. But, a few hours later, the pills wore off.

Supreme Court’s Scalia on TSA abuse: Meh

By Lisa Simeone

Anybody who thinks the Supreme Court will protect us from the TSA is dreaming. More accurately, he has his head somewhere other than above his shoulders.

Thursday

Homegrown terror

By Dave Alpert

A husband and wife terrorist team went on a killing spree last Sunday in Las Vegas, Nevada, killing two policemen in a pizzeria and a civilian in a nearby Walmart store.

World War II: The Unknown War

By Paul Craig Roberts

In my column, “The Lies Grow More Audacious,” I mentioned that Obama and the British prime minister, whom Obama has as a lap dog, just as George Bush had Tony Blair as lap dog, had managed to celebrate the defeat of Nazi Germany at the 70th anniversary of the Normandy invasion without mentioning the Russians.

The can-do spirit returns to Egypt

By Linda S. Heard

This was the day eagerly awaited by tens of millions of Egyptians. Last Sunday, former military chief Abdel-Fatah El-Sissi was sworn-in as president of the Arab Republic of Egypt after winning a landslide election victory. The architectural splendor of the imposing Supreme Constitutional Court in the Cairo district of Maadi was bathed in sunlight as politicians, dignitaries and judges entered to take their seats, shimmering like the nation’s lifeblood, the River Nile, flowing along regardless.

Look, Ma, no teeth … no future!!

By Philip A Farruggio

A close friend of the family recently got some bad news. She was told that gum disease and bone loss had caused her five molars to be infected. The only recourse was to have them all pulled out. Even gum surgery would not help at this point.

The truth of war’s lies

By Missy Comley Beattie

I would do anything to save my child. I’d learn the language, read the books, delve into the mindset of the captors, cultivate a beard, if I could. Anything.

Friday

The exorbitant cost of pseudo-educating America

The next two-trillion dollar bubble

By Ben Tanosborn

At $1.2 trillion in student debt, we may only be 60 percent along the way, but rest assured that it won’t take but 3 to 5 years before this spectacular bubble bursts … and it will do so on the economic backs of the poor, and the ghostly—ghastly might be more apropos—remnants of a fast disappearing middle class.

The big loser in Cantor’s defeat

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—The biggest loser in the surprise primary election loss of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor is the Israel Lobby. Cantor lost by a double-digit margin to former World Bank consultant Dave Brat, the candidate of the Tea Party. It is ironic that a former employee for such a bugbear for the Tea Party as the World Bank would become the “anti-globalist” Tea Party’s latest hero.

Freedom Rider: Working Families Party betrayal

By Margaret Kimberley

Supposedly progressive politics in New York offer a cautionary tale for leftists across the country. The Empire State has a Democrat-in-name-only governor, Andrew Cuomo, and a mayor of New York City, Bill de Blasio, who gets more credit for being progressive than he deserves. New York also boasts a party, Working Families, whose name implies integrity it doesn’t possess.

What Palestinian unity is all about

The real task ahead

By Ramzy Baroud

Palestinians are yet to achieve national unity despite the elation over the ‘national unity government’ now in operation in Ramallah.

Five foods that are designed so you can’t resist them

By Martha Rosenberg

There are three reasons Americans’ love affair with snacks is growing—along with their waistlines: the ubiquity of junk food, the ubiquity of junk food advertising and stealth food technology. People who polish off a whole bag of chips or cookies at one sitting (usually in front of TV) are often doing exactly what the product was designed to do—be addictive.

Week of June 2, 2014

Monday

CNN ratings plunge as anti-911 truths hit an all-time high

By Jerry Mazza

Call it what you will: twisting the facts, denying the expertise of several thousand architects and engineers; it’s all about using yellow journalism to demonize 9/11 truth and truthers. And Jake Tapper took aim on his “The Lead,” leading to new lows in so-called “coverage of AE911Truth’s 9/11 Museum brochure that’s sold at the September 11 Memorial Museum at Ground Zero in New York City.”

Brussels museum attack said to have fingerprints of a “false flag” operation

By Wayne Madsen

On Saturday, May 24, a lone gunman walked into the entrance of the Jewish Museum in Brussels and opened fire with a Kalashnikov assault rifle. Three people, including an Israeli tourist couple—Mira and Emmanuel Riva—and Dominique Sabrier, a French woman volunteer at the museum, were immediately killed in the attack. A fourth shooting victim, Alexandre Strens, a Belgian employee of the museum, died the following day.

Insanity extends beyond the shooters

By Walter Brasch

During this past week, in Scranton, Pa., a 16-year old put two bullets into the head of a taxi driver and then stole about $500 earned by the cabbie that evening.

Shots fired. Madness in progress.

By Michael Winship

This is the way it goes, because this is the way it always goes.

Benefits and dangers of organizations and groups

By Richard John Stapleton

Human affairs aboard Spaceship Earth have always been screwed up, and there has never been enough food and other necessities to go around. Unfairness has ever abounded. Homo sapiens form and join organizations and groups to increase their chances of getting their needs met, a right guaranteed by the US Constitution.

Tuesday

The Obama Doctrine: Up Yours!

By John Stanton

The Howard P. “Buck” McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2015 (Defense Authorization Act) should be renamed the Howard P. “Buck” McKeon Global Manifest Destiny Act of FY2015. The Defense Authorization Act reads like something that the Biffer-Baum Birds in Dr. Seuss’ Sleep Book might have written. And the image that most accurately depicts the collective efforts of President Obama, the Pentagon and the US Congress in the design of American national security strategy is Dr. Seuss’ illustration of the Biffer-Baum Birds constructing their nest out of bricks and threads: a precarious construction indeed.

‘Smash and Grab Palestine’ policy announced by Israeli government

By Ro’i Tov

“Palestine smashed against the wall of reality,” said Israeli Minister Bennett on June 2, after a Palestinian unity government was sworn in Ramallah. Unusually violent, the statement reflected an Israeli change of attitude towards Palestine.

Freedom Rider: Police target black children

By Margaret Kimberley

Americans should take a long look in the mirror before criticizing other nations for human rights abuses. The law enforcement system in the United States ranks among the worst in the world in the cruel treatment meted out to its citizens. Even children in this country are not safe if they are black and unlucky enough to interact with the police. Of all the various ethnic and national groups in the United States, only black people have to worry that their child may be pushed through a glass window by officers of the law.

Nutworks!

By Philip A Farruggio

Anyone who has seen the 1976 film Network can only imagine how CLAIRVOYANT the film’s writer, Paddy Chayefsky, turned out to be. The film, a dark satire, showed a future society where the media became the message and celebrity was greater than reality. Ratings were the only thing that mattered- as they apparently still are on today’s Nutworks!

The Woodpecker’s message: Call Exceptionalism’s name

By Missy Comley Beattie

I was reminded of a book I read years ago when I sat on Laura and Erma’s deck—Margaret Craven’s I Heard the Owl Call My Name—a story of a call to life, love, a recognition and acceptance of the call to death. Having made a no-whine vow, I was holed up in my condo Saturday night and most of Sunday, watching hours of French movies. (I recommend In the House.)

Wednesday

Infrastructure sticker shock: Financing costs more than building it

By Ellen Brown

Funding infrastructure through bonds doubles the price or worse. Costs can be cut in half by funding through the state’s own bank.

What Obama told us at West Point is beyond chilling

By Paul Craig Roberts

At West Point Obama told us, to the applause of West Point cadets, that “American exceptionalism” is a doctrine that justifies whatever Washington does. If Washington violates domestic and international law by torturing “detainees” or violates the Nuremberg standard by invading countries that have undertaken no hostile action against the US or its allies, “exceptionalism” is the priest’s blessing that absolves Washington’s sins against law and international norms. Washington’s crimes are transformed into Washington’s affirmation of the rule of law.

Just shoot: The mindset responsible for turning search warrants into death warrants, and SWAT teams into death squads

By John W. Whitehead

How many children, old people, and law-abiding citizens have to be injured, terrorized or killed before we call a halt to the growing rash of police violence that is wracking the country? How many family pets have to be gunned down in cold blood by marauding SWAT teams before we declare such tactics off limits? And how many communities have to be transformed into military outposts, complete with heavily armed police, military tanks, and “safety” checkpoints before we draw that line in the sand that says “not in our town”?

Is a North African security bloc in the making?

By Linda S. Heard

So-called freedom activists are beating their chests over the landslide victory of Field Marshall Abdel-Fatah El-Sissi, set to be inaugurated as Egypt’s new president next week. And they perceive the Libyan people’s backing of Gen. Khalifa Hiftar’s anti-militia onslaught as a step back from their revolutionary goals. The idea of strongmen prioritizing stability over individual freedoms is anathema to many, but the stark truth is that Western-style democracy cannot flourish amid a climate of violence.

Big Pharma profits from addiction

By Martha Rosenberg

Imagine a treatment for drug addiction and alcoholism that uses no drugs, requires no trained personnel, resources or insurance and makes no money for anyone. This “people’s program” is the anonymous twelve-step programs which have quietly saved millions for 79 years.

Thursday

‘Dispelling Wetiko’: Paul levy and the future of humanity

By Eric Larsen

Anyone who reads his work will quickly be made aware of the enormous amounts of study that lie behind the writing of Paul Levy—study in the form of wide and vast reading, of deep and patient thought, and, perhaps above all, a never-ending process of extraordinarily close observation. Observation of what? For the moment, the answer to that question can best be given in two parts. First, Paul Levy is an acute and close observer of the nature of life. Second, he is an acute and close observer of us, of we, of the ones who live inside of that life.

Fukushima is still a disaster

By Harvey Wasserman

The corporate media silence on Fukushima has been deafening even though the melted down nuclear power plant’s seaborne radiation is now washing up on American beaches.

Are you ready for nuclear war?

By Paul Craig Roberts

Pay close attention to Steven Starr’s guest column, “The Lethality of Nuclear Weapons.” Washington thinks nuclear war can be won and is planning for a first strike on Russia, and perhaps China, in order to prevent any challenge to Washington’s world hegemony.

European Parliament’s new ‘neo-Nazi/far right’—not so ‘Nazi’ and not so ‘far right’

By Wayne Madsen

Amid all the hair pulling and teeth gnashing by the Eurocrats and their overly paid pundits in the media about how the European Parliament electoral victories of the Eurosceptic French National Front, UK Independence Party, Danish People’s Party, and other “far right” parties could spell the imminent doom for the European Union, some level-headed observations are in order. Just as Europe’s once avowedly Marxist-Leninist Communist parties now sing the praises of the European Union, along with their once anti-capitalist friends in the European Green Party movement, the “neo-fascists” have moderated and can no longer be called “neo-Nazi” or totally opposed to European integration. Most of the Eurosceptic parties, for example, are supporters of NATO, which many believe is merely an American-led military enforcement arm of the EU.

Palestinian unity governance

By Stephen Lendman

It’s official. Its called “national reconciliation government.” On Monday, Palestinian ministers were ceremonially sworn in.

Friday

Understanding Israel’s corrosive influence on Western democracy

By John Chuckman

Something troubling is quietly underway in the Western world, that portion of the world’s governments that style themselves as liberal democracies and free societies. Through a number of avenues, people’s assumptions about the role of government are being undermined as their governments evolve towards a pattern established in the United States. No, I do not mean in building a neo-Roman marble repository of sacred founding writ and adopting three wrangling branches of government with empty slogans about freedom and justice for all. I do mean in the way governments, however elected and organized, regard their responsibilities towards their citizens and the world community.

Reporting on the Middle East: Please go back to the streets

By Ramzy Baroud

Irrespective of how one feels about the direction taken by various Arab revolutions in the last three years, a few facts remain incontestable. Arab revolts began in the streets of poor, despairing Arab cities, and Arabs had every right to rebel considering the dismal state of affairs in which they live.

Pope’s unbalanced neutrality in the Holy Land

By Nicola Nasser

Pope Francis’ “”pilgrimage” to the Holy Land last month proved to be an unbalanced impossible mission. The pontiff failed to strike a balance of neutrality between contradictory and irreconcilable binaries like divinity and earth, religion and politics, justice and injustice and military occupation and peace.

Obama in Europe

By Stephen Lendman

Wherever he goes, trouble follows. He’s the latest in a long line of rogue US leaders.

Whatever became of morality?

By Paul Craig Roberts

What are we to make of this: 12-year-old Wisconsin girl stabbed 19 times; friends arrested?

Week of May 26, 2014

Monday

The state as protection racket

Chapters in the history of daylight robbery

By Dr T P Wilkinson

I always ask myself when someone says or writes “loss,” where did the money go? Even when a ship is lost at sea there is generally wreckage. Of course, the ocean is bigger than the economy and it is possible that a ship’s remains disappear beyond recovery. The price of abandoning the very modest social gains of the New Deal in the US and social democracy in Europe with the ascendancy of Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan has been enormous, not only for US and European working people but for the rest of the world. In fact, the meter is still running with no indication of when it will stop.

American defense contractors profiting from Russian and Chinese engineering, technology, manpower

By John Stanton

It is a fine thing that Boeing is supporting STEM education in China. But as part of the American Defense Industrial Base Critical Infrastructure, Boeing regularly moans about the dearth of America’s own STEM/ aerospace engineering capability. For example, in a glossy publication from 2007 comes the article Engineering Brain Drain? by Louise Wilkerson, in which the reader learns that “According to a recent study by Aviation Week & Space Technology magazine, the United States is turning out only about 110,000 engineers a year compared with China’s 600,000 a year and India’s 350,000 a year.”

The social cost of GMOs

By Paul Craig Roberts

Ecological economists such as Herman Daly write that the more full the world becomes, the higher are the social or external costs of production.

Irresponsible China bashing

By Stephen Lendman

China bashing reflects official US policy. Washington does it numerous ways.

66-year Nakba: I saw Yafa, Land of Oranges

By Ramzy Baroud

In ‘Jaffa: Land of Oranges,’ Ghassan Kanafani described his exile from the Palestinian coastal city of Yafa.

Tuesday

The wonders of the ‘free’ market

By Dave Alpert

In 2010, Michelle Holmes and Wendy Chen, physicians and faculty members at Harvard Medical School, published an observational study in The Journal of Clinical Oncology that showed that women with breast cancer who took aspirin at least once every week were 50% less likely to die of breast cancer.

Russia’s rise to global power

By Paul Craig Roberts

Western propaganda about events in Ukraine has two main purposes. One is to cover up, or to distract from, Washington’s role in overthrowing the elected democratic government of Ukraine. The other is to demonize Russia.

Freedom Rider: Newark rejects $100 million school scam

By Margaret Kimberley

In 2010, Facebook’s billionaire founder Mark Zuckerberg joined Newark, New Jersey mayor Cory Booker on the Oprah Winfrey show with great fanfare. The purpose of their appearance was to announce that Zuckerberg was contributing $100 million to the Newark, New Jersey school system.

The ‘revolutionary’ face of the Syrian conflict

By Nicola Nasser

Reports abound by international organizations about the responsibility of the Syrian government for the human rights violations in the ongoing conflict in Syria, now in its fourth year, but the responsibility of the insurgents has been kept away from media spotlight for political reasons.

New passenger discovers TSA grope policy

By Lisa Simeone

Charlotte Ann Kimbrough is a 57-year-old retired law enforcement professional. She worked for 32 years in an administrative capacity with the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, and other federal law enforcement agencies. She has two metal hip replacements.

Wednesday

Obama in Afghanistan

By Stephen Lendman

He left Washington Saturday. He arrived in Afghanistan Sunday. It was his fourth visit. He stayed less than four hours

The ‘Corker’ in U.S.-Russian relations

By Wayne Madsen

Merriam Webster’s English dictionary defines a “corker” as an “amusing person.” When it comes to drafting legislation to “punish” Russia with sanctions over the situation in Ukraine, Tennessee’s Republican Senator and ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Bob Corker certainly lives up to his name …

Enforced democracy takes a beating

By Linda S. Heard

The principle of government ‘of the people, by the people, for the people’ is an admirable aspiration, but that’s as far as it goes. Not all ‘the people,’ even in the most developed nations, are politically aware and in many countries around the world there exists poverty and illiteracy. Secondly, democracy disintegrates when ‘the people’ turn to violence. Thirdly, the imposition of democracy on countries that are, in essence, tribal or sectarian, is akin to planting roses on stone.

Read and weep

By Missy Comley Beattie

I’ve been a crybaby lately. Okay, not just lately. I’m an admitted sap, tears blurring my vision when I watch a poignant scene in a movie or read anything inspirational or depressing.

A day in the park

By Jerry Mazza

The day was Memorial Day and we were meeting my cousin and his wife in in Brooklyn’s Botanic Gardens. The price was right at $5 per senior. And in we walked checked by a polite guard.

Thursday

Haftar leads a coup: A general’s odd war on the Muslim Brotherhood

By Ramzy Baroud

On 16 May, Libya’s rogue general, Khalifa Haftar, staged several bloody attacks against other Libyan militias in the name of eradicating terrorism by leading a paramilitary force evasively named the Libyan National Army. His well-equipped brigades were rapidly joined by officers from national army bases in the eastern parts of the country.

Making the ultimate sacrifice

By Dave Alpert

Every year we set aside the last Monday in the month of May to take time to think about and honor those men and women who have died defending “our country.” At least that’s what I always thought but while watching a baseball game in Atlanta, Georgia, part of their Memorial Day ceremony was to have 5 fighter jets, flying in formation roar over the stadium to the cheers of the thousands of fans. This caused me to wonder whether we were honoring the men and women who served and died or were we really honoring testosterone.

Have you ever heard of the JOBS Act? Neither have many would-be entrepreneurs, especially women

By Martha Rosenberg

The JOBS Act is a “game changer” that would allow “ordinary Americans … to go online and invest in entrepreneurs they believe in,” says President Obama.

Why the upper caste leftists in India are ‘upper’ rather than ‘left’

By Prakash Kona

Two things I wish to emphasize: one is that a section of the upper castes, the ones who might not be privileged enough, but wouldn’t mind holding on to some kind of power or other, have an interest in playing an ideological role in perpetuating casteism while seeming to oppose it. That is my personal observation of the upper caste leftists who are usually trying to portray themselves as defenders of the “lower” castes for no other reason except that they have personal agendas. Interestingly, we have a fair number of people among the “lower” castes themselves, who need the ideological support of the disgruntled and more subtly opportunistic of the upper castes, in order to enhance their position in the caste hierarchy. They don’t want to change the caste hierarchy; they merely wish to be the new upper castes.

The workless class woke up

By Gilad Atzmon

The undeniable surge in the support for Euro Sceptics and right wing parties in Monday’s European Parliament election, suggests that the European working class, isn’t as apathetic as the Zionised Left wants it to be.

Friday

We’ve had more than enough revelations … and the American Majority has spoken

The American Majority & its deadly chronic decease called apathy

By Sibel Edmonds

They say we need more revelations. I say we have had more than enough revelations on synthetic wars, atrocities, surveillance and torture. They wonder when the majority of Americans are going to speak up. And I say: The American Majority has already spoken—loud and clear.

Bilderberg elite gather in Denmark to circle their wagons

By Wayne Madsen

It’s not easy these days being members of the world’s elite class of business tycoons, bankers, political leaders of various “neo”-ideology stripes, and “bought-and-paid for” members of the media. In the European elections, the people have spoken. What the European electorate had to say about the globalization promoted for years by the cabal of Bilderberg billionaires, politicians, and propagandists that gathers in different countries annually to plot their next moves is certainly not music to the ears of the elite.

A culture falling apart as fast as the economy

By Frank Scott

Each day another culturally reduced group is stricken with abuse, panic, anger and driven to what seem fresh new demands for justice.

The ‘boys will be boys’ canard has to go

By Dave Alpert

I have done much writing and posting about racism, class warfare, capitalism, imperialism, etc. But one area I have neglected to address is sexism or the status of women, not only in our society, but globally. But since I live in this society, let’s focus here.

The ‘moral equivalence of the Founding Fathers’

By Dr T P Wilkinson

Since 1976, the bicentennial of the unilateral declaration of independence (UDI) that led to the founding of the United States of America from thirteen originally British colonies, Black History Month has been an officially recognised period—in February—when the descendants of the Founding Fathers acknowledge that the descendants of their slaves also have a history. Also in February, Presidents’ Day—initially George Washington’s birthday but now a combined birthday celebration for Washington and Abraham Lincoln: the Father of the Country and the Great Liberator.

Week of May 19, 2014

Monday

Putin blinks in Ukraine standoff with the US

By Ismael Hossein-zadeh

In the faceoff with the United States and its allies over the Ukraine crisis, President Vladimir Putin of Russia seems to have blinked. On May 7, he asked the pro-Russian protesters who were calling for the May 11 referendum on “federalization” to postpone the autonomy vote. At the same time he also endorsed the junta’s hastily scheduled May 25 presidential election, which is designed to give legitimacy to the illegitimate regime in Kiev. Mr. Putin further announced that Russian troops along the Ukraine-Russian border had returned to their usual (pre-crisis) positions.

NSA targets embassies in black bag operations

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—The latest tranche of classified documents from NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden have been released in Glenn Greenwald’s book, “No Place to Hide.” The documents paint a picture of an NSA intent on capturing every digital and analog signal in the world, a program codenamed ASPHALT, or simply, “Collect-It-All.”

What the media are not telling us about Yemen

The bloody war that doesn’t exist

By Ramzy Baroud

“In Yemen today, the US embassy is closed to the public. Officials telling CNN there is credible information of a threat against Western interests there,” a CNN news anchor read from the news bulletin on May 8.

The fight goes on: FCC votes to consider rules that could end net neutrality

By Michael Winship

The vote was taken at the Federal Communications Commission Thursday morning, as drums pounded and hundreds of demonstrators supporting Net neutrality chanted outside FCC headquarters.

Freedom Rider: Wilson Goode, Barack Obama and the good negro

By Margaret Kimberley

On May 13, 1985, the mayor of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, allowed a lynch mob comprised of the police and fire departments to kill eleven black people, including five children. He also allowed them to burn 61 houses to the ground which left more than 200 people homeless. Wilson Goode was that city’s first black mayor but being mayor was not his top priority. More than anything else he wanted to be a good negro and earn a stamp of approval from white people. Therein lies a cautionary tale which we would do well to remember today.

Tuesday

Child abduction and sex trafficking are major problems in the US

By Mike Kuhlenbeck

The abduction of hundreds of Nigerian school girls by the extremist group Boko Haram in recent months has received a lot of attention through social media outlets. This tragic situation has rightfully created outrage, but many human rights activists have lost sight of the fact that human trafficking is also happening in the United States on a grand scale.

Doctor Strangelove returns as General Breedlove

By Wayne Madsen

In Stanley Kubrick’s 1954 madcap dark comedy “Dr. Strangelove,” the clearly demented main character is a former scientist for Adolf Hitler who ends up as a military adviser to a fictional American president involved in a nuclear standoff with the Soviet Union. The Strangelove character was not merely a figment of Kubrick’s otherwise brilliant imagination. Dr. Strangelove, who urges a massive nuclear strike on the Soviet Union, is based on two immigrant Cold Warriors from Europe possessing doctoral degrees: Dr. Henry Kissinger, the Machiavellian national security adviser President Richard Nixon and Russian affairs adviser to President Barack Obama, and Dr. Edward Teller, the father of America’s hydrogen bomb. In real life, Kissinger, a German and an alleged Jew, and Teller, a Hungarian, brought their anti-Russian European political “baggage” to bear on America’s policy toward Moscow during the height of the Cold War. Kissinger and Teller, like the revenge-seeking Nazi, Strangelove, wanted Russia punished for personal political reasons.

Five gross ways your meat is kept safe to eat

By Martha Rosenberg

It is no secret that in the war against meat pathogens in commercial U.S. meat production, the pathogens are winning. The logical result of the tons of antibiotics that Big Meat gives livestock (not because they are sick but to fatten them) is clear: antibiotics that no longer work against antibiotic-resistant diseases like staph (MRSA), enterococci (VRE) and C. difficile

The truth about sociopaths

By Missy Comley Beattie

Although his conviction has been overturned three times, Albert Woodfox remains in prison in solitary confinement

Postcard from the end of America: Levittown, Pennsylvania

By Linh Dinh

In 1947, the first Levittown was built in New York State, then in 1952, an even bigger one was erected in Pennsylvania. Marketed as “THE MOST PERFECTLY PLANNED COMMUNITY IN AMERICA,” Levittown was the prototypical American suburb. For only $10,990, or $100 down then $67 a month, you could own three bedrooms, two bathrooms, front lawn, back yard and garage, plus access to five Olympic-sized pools, with free swimming and diving lessons thrown in. Most soothingly, you no longer had to deal with strangers above, below or abutting you, or dark skinned neighbors who may alarm or irk you as you went about your white routines.

Wednesday

Through the looking glass darkly: Government as we wish it or government as we will it

By Arthur D. Robbins

One day while Alice is winding up a ball of wool that Kitty persists in undoing, she gets it into her head that there must be a world behind the looking glass (mirror) where everything is backward. Suddenly, she finds herself up on the mantelpiece staring into the looking glass. Then she walks through to the reality on the other side to find a world that is set up like a chessboard and chess pieces are animated human-like creatures. The reflected reality is the opposite of real reality. Time goes backwards

Why Putin? Why Hitler?

By Dr T P Wilkinson

There would appear to be something grotesque in the inflationary use of the term “Hitler” to attack any national leader opposed by the US regime and its vassals. What does the word “Hitler” actually mean, esp. if anyone can be compared to Hitler, except actual fascists?

Empire over life is Washington’s guiding principle

Militarist bunkum

By Paul Craig Roberts

Did you know that 85 to 90 percent of war’s casualties are non-combatant civilians? That is the conclusion reached by a nine-person research team in the June 2014 issue of the American Journal of Public Health. The deaths of soldiers who are fighting the war are a small part of the human and economic cost. Clearly, wars do not protect the lives of civilians. The notion that soldiers are dying for us is false. Non-combatants are the main victims of war.

Judge, jury, and executioner: Have the police become a law unto themselves?

By John W. Whitehead

Living in a free society means not having to look over your shoulder to see whether the government is watching or fearing that a government agent might perpetuate violence upon you.

Erdogan reacts like a loose cannon

By Linda S. Heard

When things are his way, the Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan expounds democratic values and there’s no denying that on his watch his country has largely enjoyed economic stability and global respect. However, when problems arise, his usually poised veneer is seen to crack in a very unpleasant fashion raising the question: Is he a wolf in benign democratic clothing?

Thursday

Is a new “cold war” coming? You can’t be serious

A somewhat incendiary reply to a ludicrous question

By Dr T P Wilkinson

This question is asked repeatedly in the English-language media—probably the most heavily censored data streams in the world (a point to which I will return). Why should anyone worry about a new “cold war”? Perhaps it would be more relevant to worry about the extent of current and future “hot” ones?

Obama’s authorization for breaking up the Russian Federation

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—The plan by neoconservative elements embedded in the Obama administration to seek a Yugoslavia-style breakup of the Russian Federation continues to manifest itself by President Obama’s continued commitment to the Captive Nations doctrine first enunciated by Ukrainian right-wing nationalist provocateur Dr. Lev Dobriansky.

All onboard the EU gravy train

By Joseph M. Cachia

In a very short time, voters across the EU (that is those who decide to vote) will head to the polls to elect the new European Parliament. And obviously without any doubt, here in Malta, we are having a good serving of this whole charade, with the typical pageantry.

Annihilation of the casteist mindset

By Prakash Kona

This is not a review as such but a reflection on a few aspects of the speech Annihilation of Caste by Dr. B. R. Ambedkar, written to be presented in 1936 at an anti-caste association in Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan.

Walking is life

By Jerry Mazza

I once had a shrink whose basic axiom was ”Walking is life.” Obviously, if you walk a lot, you exercise your arms, legs, and torso, you also exercise that inner voice, your brain, spirit, call it what you will, that part that reflects what you see in the world around you.

Friday

Trilateral defense ministers meeting continues to build North American security framework

By Dana Gabriel

As an extension of the North American Leaders Summit which was held in February, the defense ministers from the U.S., Canada and Mexico quietly met last month to discuss continental security issues.

Obama decides to take on China and Russia

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—Pentagon sources have told WMR that they are alarmed at the rapid pace at which the Obama White House has moved to increase tensions with China so quickly on the heels of a breakdown in U.S. relations with Russia.

The sounds of silence—political style

By Walter Brasch

A hush has fallen over our house.

More on Belgium’s purchases of Fed Treasuries

By Paul Craig Roberts and Dave Kranzler

In response to our account of the mysterious large rise in Belgium’s Treasury purchases, The Fed is the great deceiver, it was suggested that the transaction would show up on the Fed’s balance sheet. However, the Fed is under no obligation to show the transaction.

Why Medicare pays so much for psychiatric drugs

By Martha Rosenberg

“Never mind” said the Obama administration in March after its proposal to limit automatic Medicare coverage of pricey depression and psychiatric drugs was met with a Pharma funded backlash. It apparently wasn’t worth it as “patients” on the Hill yelled “You’re going to limit WHAT?” and won.

Week of May 12, 2014

Monday

After Syria debacle, what now?

By Dr. Ismail Salami

Thanks to the indefatigable efforts of Iran and Russia, Syria is gradually recuperating from a callous crisis wrought by Washington and its regional Arab puppets.

OFAC: Obama’s global ‘collection agency’

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—No longer content with freezing and seizing the assets of dictators, the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), under Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew, is now busy seizing the assets of democratically-elected leaders around the world.

Fascism’s willing co-conspirators

By Stephen Lendman

Western media scoundrels mock legitimacy. They march in lockstep with lawless US policy.

US Supreme Court blasts another hole in the wall separating state and religion

By Dave Alpert

On April 3, I posted an article on religion (“Freedom From Religion”) in which I differentiated between an individual’s right to worship whom he/she wants and how to worship from the destructive history of organized religion. Historically, organized religion has served as a tool of the ruling class to control the masses of people and as a vehicle for wars and intolerance of “others.”

Call the cops at your peril

By Paul Craig Roberts

“Live free or die” is the motto of the state of New Hampshire. I hope the residents are prepared to die, because living free is not what they do. NH is merely a cog within the Amerikan Stasi State, but I am referring to what goes on within NH itself, not the police state existence imposed by Washington.

Tuesday

The fracking prostitutes of American colleges

Part 3 of 3 parts

By Walter Brasch

Among the mission statements of the University of North Dakota Department of Geology and Geological Engineering is that it “strives to develop in its engineering graduates keen insight and abilities to design an environmentally sound and sustainable future for humanity.”

The Russians are coming … again … and they’re still ten feet tall!

By William Blum

So, what do we have here? In Libya, in Syria, and elsewhere the United States has been on the same side as the al-Qaeda types. But not in Ukraine. That’s the good news. The bad news is that in Ukraine the United States is on the same side as the neo-Nazi types, who—taking time off from parading around with their swastika-like symbols and calling for the death of Jews, Russians and Communists—on May 2 burned down a trade-union building in Odessa, killing scores of people and sending hundreds to hospital; many of the victims were beaten or shot when they tried to flee the flames and smoke; ambulances were blocked from reaching the wounded. Try and find an American mainstream media entity that has made a serious attempt to capture the horror.

Israeli ties compromise Asian support for Arabs

By Nicola Nasser

Israel has carved economic inroads into Asia deep enough to compromise the traditional Asian political support for Arabs. If this trend continues, the growing economic Israeli-Asian relations could in no time translate into political ties that would neutralize Asia in the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Media pile on: Don Sterling, yes; the empire, no!

By Philip A Farruggio

Let me preface these thoughts by stating that what another billionaire says or does because he feels above the rest of we serfs is never surprising to me. What Don Sterling, owner of the Clippers basketball team, said and implied is murmured to this writer many times by many people … always in either whispers or in secure settings. Racism is alive and well in Amerika, as it always has been since our founding.

Different value systems

By Missy Comley Beattie

Sally Caldwell became a friend, someone who helped me through a dark time with her kindness, humor, and advice on how to make sense of the indefensible. She instructed me to say over and over, “He has a completely different value system.”

Wednesday

The twilight zone of American political life where almost every word of news isn’t what it seems

By John Chuckman

I think a description of the political space in which we live as a kind of twilight reality is not an exaggeration. Not only is a great deal of the news about the world we read and hear manipulated and even manufactured, but a great deal of genuine news is simply missing. People often do not know what is happening in the world, although they generally believe they do know after reading their newspapers or listening to news broadcasts. People receive the lulling sounds or words of most of this kind of news almost unconsciously just as they do to the strains of piped-in “elevator music” in stores and offices.

Economic hate crime

By Frank Scott

“Any government with both the power and the will to remedy the major defects of the capitalist system would have the power and the will to abolish it altogether.”

Obama comic strip: Opportunity to be Superman … or Sad Sack

By Ben Tanosborn

Recently, I find myself in a high state of discomfort when by chance or design I’m looking at the POTUS adorning the TV screen addressing issues which should be of concern to all of us here in the United States and, at times, people around the globe. As I focus on his image and listen to Barack Obama, I cannot help but feel pity and disgust as I see before me an inglorious effigy of Sad Sack.

Uniting the people of the world

By Mohammed Mesbahi

At this time of economic turmoil it can be difficult to perceive for oneself how the principle of sharing is a solution to world problems, and this is especially true for many intellectuals. There are libraries of books and reports that analyse what is wrong with society, the majority of which are trying to reach the impossible—which is to propose new ideas and alternative policies to the government. A government that represents and upholds the disastrous commercialisation of our political, economic and social structures.

Is this art installation too risky or offensive to display?

By Martha Rosenberg

It has been 24 years since an inflammatory art exhibit vaulted the city of Cincinnati and its Contemporary Arts Center to national attention. A sadomasochistic photo installation by the late Robert Mapplethorpe, condemned by the late Senator Jesse Helms (R-NC), forced what was believed to be the first criminal trial of an art museum, especially one centered on obscenity. If convicted, the museum faced up to $10,000 in fines and its director, Dennis Barrie, up to a year in jail. The center was acquitted. Thanks to the face-off between Mapplethorpe and Helms and shocking photos like a man urinating in another man’s mouth, the trial put discussion of what is “art” and what is “obscenity” on the nation’s front burner.

Thursday

Orwell’s nightmare: The NSA and Google—Big Brother meets Big Business

By John W. Whitehead

What would happen if the most powerful technology company in the world and the largest clandestine spying agency in the world joined forces?

The Federal Reserve is the great deceiver

By Paul Craig Roberts and Dave Kranzler

Is the Fed “tapering”? Did the Fed really cut its bond purchases during the three-month period November 2013 through January 2014? Apparently not if foreign holders of Treasuries are unloading them.

Votes, not assumptions, will decide Egypt election

By Linda S. Heard

There are no ifs or buts about it. The word on the street is “When Al Sissi comes …” the operative word being “when.” This hypothesis is supported by polls indicating the former army chief can expect to garner between 72–82 percent of the vote that is scheduled for May 26 and 27, while his only rival, the veteran leftist politician and leader of the Nasserist Party, Hamdeen Sabahi, can expect no more than two percent. Such assumptions come with their own risks.

Boko Haram and tentacles of terror

By Dr. Ismail Salami

Dwelling in a life-in-death situation, nearly three hundred innocent Nigerian schoolgirls are going through a psychological ordeal at the hands of the notorious Boko Haram Takfiri group.

What you can do for the kidnapped Nigerian schoolgirls

By Mary Shaw

By now you probably know that more than 200 Nigerian schoolgirls were abducted last month by Boko Haram terrorists and remain missing. Some of the girls have reportedly been forced to marry their captors while others have been sold into slavery for $12 each.

Friday

We should slice the Pentagon budget—it would save trillions and rescue America

By Nicolas J S Davies

Next week, Congress will begin debate on a roughly $601 billion Pentagon budget for FY2015. Before we let this pass unchallenged, let’s take a few minutes to put it in some historical perspective.

Ukraine’s steady transformation to a Fourth Reich nation

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—Not since the end of World War II has the world seen anything as close to a Fourth Reich recreation of a Third Reich regime as it has seen in Ukraine. Just as many of the German Nazi Party’s Brown Shirts were transformed by Adolf Hitler into loyal members of the SS, neo-Nazi gangs in Ukraine have been sworn into the new Ukrainian National Guard.

Widening cracks in US-Israeli relations

By Linda S. Heard

It wasn’t so long ago that Washington and Tel Aviv had each other’s back unconditionally. While it’s true that there’s always been behind-closed-doors disagreements, but spats were rarely publicized. At one time the relationship was considered almost sacrosanct. Israel was, arguably, America’s proxy in the Middle East creating a balance of power in the oil-rich region, while Israel was dependent on US aid (direct aid estimated at over $130 billion since 1949), loans, subsidies, weapons and diplomatic clout at the United Nations. That tied-at-the-hip partnership is now being questioned.

Michelle Obama’s Nigerian hypocrisy

Children of lesser expectations

By Missy Comley Beattie

Remember when Barack Obama said that Trayvon Martin could have been his son. I was reminded of this when I read that the First Lady had condemned the abduction of those Nigerian schoolgirls: “In these girls, Barack and I see our own daughters,” Michelle Obama said.

There’s always a fly in the ointment

By Jerry Mazza

Thus spoke my friend, Roz Panepento, returning from the double canonization of two popes. Commenting as Robert Burns first did, “The best laid plans of mice and men often go astray.” In other words, even the cranky 85-year old priest who accompanied her group, and who wanted to dig in the heated soil of mezzo giorno got heat prostration. It reminded her of the lack of perfection anything in life posses, like the priest with this tongue sticking out in thirst. Then, too, The best laid plans of mice and men also comes from John Steinbeck’s 1937 portrait of the intellectual disability of Lenny and George in Steinbeck’s ‘Of Mice and Men.’

Week of May 5, 2014

Monday

93 countries that have changed their minds about Obama

And 31 where he’s less popular than George W. Bush—including Kenya

By Nicolas J S Davies

During the Bush years, people all over the world were horrified by America’s aggression, human rights abuses and militarism. By 2008, only one in three people around the world approved of the job performance of U.S. leaders. The election of President Obama broadcast his message of hope and change far beyond U.S. shores, and Gallup’s 2009 U.S.-Global Leadership Project (USGLP) recorded a sharp rise in global public approval of U.S. leadership to 49 percent.

Don’t let Net neutrality become another broken promise

By Bill Moyers and Michael Winship

Barack Obama told us there would be no compromise on Net neutrality. We heard him say it back in 2007, when he first was running for president.

Washington intends Russia’s demise

By Paul Craig Roberts

Washington has no intention of allowing the crisis in Ukraine to be resolved. Having failed to seize the country and evict Russia from its Black Sea naval base, Washington sees new opportunities in the crisis.

Columbus or Native American Day?

By Eric Walberg

The writing is on the wall for Columbus Day. In the latest move to rid the calendar of its day of infamy, in April, the Minneapolis City Council voted unanimously to rename Columbus Day to Indigenous People’s Day. Many American Indians have long resisted the observance of a day to honor Christopher Columbus.

Anger turned outward

True path(ology)

By Missy Comley Beattie

Tuesday evening and I’m sitting at the dining table, typing. There’s a glass of wine to the left of my laptop. Separating me from dim daylight, the blinds are lowered to the floor, a shield against the approaching thunderstorms, possible tornadoes and hail. Those blinds are about as protective as confetti.

Tuesday

The fracking prostitutes of American colleges

Part 2 of a 3-part series

By Walter Brasch

Two of the reasons Pennsylvania has no severance tax and one of the lowest taxes upon shale gas drilling are because of an overtly corporate-friendly legislature and a research report from Penn State, a private state-related university that receives about $300 million a year in public funds

Latin American nations under assault in massive Obama campaign of aggression

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—President Obama reversed the largely “benign neglect” of his predecessor toward the wave of progressive governments coming to power in Latin America and, at some time during his administration, he signed a classified presidential Finding” to do whatever is necessary to oust left-leaning governments in the Western Hemisphere and replace them with docile, pro-American ones.

Fiery chaos in Odessa: 42 perish after Ukrainians launch Waco-like assault

The group behind the clashes is Right Sector, the strike force of the U.S.-backed coup that overthrew Ukraine’s government

By Nicolas J S Davies

The death toll in Odessa stands at 42 people killed, most of them burned to death or suffocated by smoke inhalation in the inferno at the Trade Unions House. There is no dispute over who were the victims and who were their killers. The victims were pro-Russian protesters who had occupied the building. The attackers who set fire to it with petrol bombs were members of Right Sector, the ultra-Nationalist strike force of the U.S.-backed coup that overthrew the elected government of Ukraine in February.

Canonization politics: The diverse legacies of John Paul II and John XXIII

By Prakash Kona

I am seriously distressed at the choice not to mention the speed with which John Paul II was canonized as if to seal a reactionary agenda which, in essence, defines what the Catholic Church has been standing for in the past couple of decades and has stood for more than a thousand years since the message of its founder, a carpenter’s son, from a remote village corner, crossed the arid West Asian landscapes and became a religion of the Roman empire.

Willful blindness: Abraham Foxman and the Armenian Genocide

By Pierce Nahigyan

Few would expect a survivor of the Holocaust to be the face of genocide denial. Imagine the surprise of Suffolk Law School’s student body when its administration’s chosen commencement speaker turned out to be just that.

Wednesday

The New York Times pens an “epitaph” for nuke power

By Harvey Wasserman

In support of the dying nuclear power industry, the New York Times Editorial Board has penned an inadvertent epitaph.

The destabilization of a friendly neighbor by infiltrating and radicalizing secessionist groups

It happened closer to home than you might think

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—A nuclear-armed superpower deployed intelligence operatives to a neighboring country. The intelligence agents immediately set about to infiltrate a radical secessionist movement in order to push it toward committing acts of kidnapping, assassination, and other violence. After the kidnapping of a foreign diplomat, the central government invoked draconian national security and war measures statutes, suspending civil liberties. The secessionists, who demanded their language, cultural, and political rights within a supposed “federal” system, were demonized by the foreign-led infiltration and radicalization of their movement.

Drones: Obama’s invisible war

By Dr. Ismail Salami

In the midst of a crisis which has in recent weeks created a political chasm between Russia and the United States, there is an ongoing carnage in the name of combating terrorism against Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Somalia.

Martial law, detention camps and kangaroo courts: Are we recreating the Third Reich?

By John W. Whitehead

Despite what some may think, the Constitution is no magical incantation against government wrongdoing. Indeed, it’s only as effective as those who abide by it. However, without courts willing to uphold the Constitution’s provisions when government officials disregard it and a citizenry knowledgeable enough to be outraged when those provisions are undermined, it provides little to no protection against SWAT team raids, domestic surveillance, police shootings of unarmed citizens, indefinite detentions, and the like.

Post-racist America?

By Dave Alpert

The post-racist society of the U.S. has taken some serious blows these past two weeks. We have Cliven Bundy, wealthy rancher from Nevada, explaining why the “Negro” was better off as a slave and we have Donald Sterling, billionaire owner of the Los Angeles Clippers basketball team expressing anger at his girlfriend for socializing with African-Americans.

Thursday

Gangster state America

Where is America’s democracy?

By Paul Craig Roberts

Anyone who looks carefully behind the veil of words cannot find democracy in America. For years, I have been writing that the US government is no longer accountable to law or to the people (see, for example, my book, How America Was Lost). The constitution has been set aside, and the executive branch is degenerating into Caesarism.

A strange, soulless man and his utterly failed president

By John Chuckman

How vividly I remember the photos of Obama in Berlin during his campaign in 2008: streets literally flooded with people keen to get a glimpse of a promising young politician, expressing for us all how exhausted the world was with the most ignorant and contemptible man ever to have been a president. Reporters said a quarter of million turned out to see a man who was a junior senator and had no claim yet to being a world figure. It was intoxicating to think this bright, attractive figure might replace the murderous buffoon, George Bush, and his éminence grise, Dick Cheney, a man who might comfortably have served any of the 20th century’s great bloody dictators.

Vice is not nice and rivals the ‘Beast’

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—Vice Magazine, the online “news” site founded in 1994 in Montreal as the “Voice of Montreal,” has become a major influential media outlet. But the online magazine also appears to be doing the bidding of Western governments in aiming its fury at Russia, North Korea, and other countries with which are receiving full barrages from the neoconservative propaganda industry.

Cecily McMillan, victim of police assault, found guilty, in jail

By Lisa Simeone

In the continuing cavalcade of innocent people put in prison in this country—the vast majority of whom are poor and/or people of color—we now add Cecily McMillan, an Occupy activist who was assaulted by a New York City cop and who is now in jail for it.

Postcard from the end of America: Manhattan

By Linh Dinh

Getting off the Greyhound bus at the Port Authority Terminal, I immediately saw a man in his mid-50s digging through a garbage can. With his right hand, he held a plastic tray on which were placed whatever edible scraps he could find. Lickable flecks clung to his ample brown beard. Chewing while scavenging, he was quite leisurely with his task and no one among the many people sitting or standing nearby paid him any attention. Done with one trash can, he moved to the next, and since there were so many in this huge building, I imagined his daily buffet to be quite ample and varied.

Friday

Robbing Main Street to prop up Wall Street

Why Jerry Brown’s rainy day fund is a bad idea

By Ellen Brown, J.D.

There is no need to sequester funds urgently needed by Main Street to pay for Wall Street’s malfeasance. Californians can have their cake and eat it too—with a state-owned bank.

Freedom Rider: How not to ‘bring back our girls’

The last thing Nigeria needs is a foreign military presence to prop up its corrupt government

By Margaret Kimberley

Bring back our girls. The message is a simple one that resonates with millions of people around the world. Those four words were first seen in a now famous twitter hashtag in the aftermath of the kidnapping of 280 teenagers from a school in Chibok, Nigeria on April 14, 2014. The Boko Haram group which is fighting that country’s government admits to holding the girls captive.

USA is a sinkhole: What’s worth fighting for?

By John Stanton

A nation that refuses to take care of all of its mothers and all of its young children has no future.

Navigating Syria: The impossible, indispensable mission

By Ramzy Baroud

I unfriended another Facebook friend this week. It may seem to be a trivial matter, but for me, it is not. The reason behind my action was Syria. As in Egypt, Syria has instigated many social media breakups with people whom, until then, were regarded with a degree of respect and admiration.

Medical care and expensive bureaucracy

By William Orthwein

Some 63 years ago, my wife and I had started our family. Shortly after that I was in graduate school in engineering at the University of Michigan and working part-time at their Willow Run Research Center, so my income was only adequate. Two of our children were born in the hospital in Ypsilanti, MI, where I lived because it was cheaper than living in Ann Arbor.

Week of April 28, 2014

Monday

Abe’s ‘Rising Sun’ makes Asia nervous

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, President Obama’s sushi dining partner, is stoking fears across Asia that he is not only contemplating but looking forward to a military confrontation with China. While many Asian countries fear China’s emerging clout they also have long memories of Japanese militarism and the revanchist signals from Tokyo are also fraying nerves in capitals from Seoul to Manila and Hanoi to Jakarta.

The sickly smell of lies and death

By John Chuckman

Only the other day, Benjamin Netanyahu earned a small note of immortality when he said the peace talks were ended by the new arrangements between the Palestine Authority and Hamas: Netanyahu’s announcement bundled a record number of lies into one mouthful of words.

America’s folk hero

By Dave Alpert

About a week ago, in an article I posted, I asked, “Who is Cliven Bundy?” Today, that question probably does not have to be answered by me. Mr. Bundy is currently the darling of the mainstream media, a man who, with the support of his armed vigilante cowboys, stared down the federal government.

This is obscene

By Missy Comley Beattie

So, Sigourney Weaver portrays Elaine who is portraying Hillary. Bud, Elaine’s husband, is a former U.S. president and an inveterate philander whom Elaine divorces.

Spring has sprung again in New York

By Jerry Mazza

The sun is pouring down on The Upper West Side, Broadway. The Market is glistening with fresh produce. And life suddenly seems more livable and invigorating. I’m watching the trees blossom, some white, some pink, and it all seems a miracle happening all over again. Life, precious life, is here again. Yet over the rest of the world the same can’t be said. Life in the Ukraine is like a bad dream. Kiev is leaning against Eastern and Western Crimea and outbreaks of hostility are taking place and taking lives.

Tuessday

The fracking prostitutes of American colleges

Part 1 of a 2-part series

By Walter Brasch

Lackawanna College, a two-year college in Scranton, Pa., has become a prostitute.

Moving closer to war

By Paul Craig Roberts

The Obama regime, wallowing in hubris and arrogance, has recklessly escalated the Ukrainian crisis into a crisis with Russia. Whether intentionally or stupidly, Washington’s propagandistic lies are driving the crisis to war. Unwilling to listen to any more of Washington’s senseless threats, Moscow no longer accepts telephone calls from Obama and US top officials.

US foreign policy on Ukraine: Hubris wrapped in clumsiness

By Ben Tanosborn

Yes, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrev is absolutely right when he states that Americans are running the show in Ukraine. Well, in Kiev anyway!

A tribute to the desperate poor (and a plea for justice)

By Dennis Rahkonen

It was the kind of story that might have qualified as “crazy news” if the subject hadn’t been so tragically sad. You know, the sort of goofy stuff suited for amusing water cooler talk the next morning.

American democracy now an oligarchy

By Joel S. Hirschhorn

History has been made. But few Americans are aware of it or angry about it. I say: Wake up Americans. A war has been waged against US democracy, from the inside. Time to pick a side and fight back.

Wednesday

An end and a beginning: R.I.P. Michael C. Ruppert 1951–2014

By Kéllia Ramares-Watson

On the morning of April 15, 2014, the only thing on my groggy mind was mailing out my tax returns. So I was shocked to see that my first piece of email, from the Fans of Michael C. Ruppert page on Facebook, was an announcement that Mike had committed suicide two days earlier. I had been boycotting Facebook for about two years, but had gotten the message because I had not disabled my account. I merely refused to log in. Then suddenly, I had to.

The New York Times’ Russia bashing stench

By Stephen Lendman

In 2005, Chicago’s famed City News Bureau closed. The New York Times correspondents, contributors and editors ignore its notable principle.

No sign of Lebanon’s friends in times of need

By Linda S. Heard

I’m in Beirut for the first time in 14 years and can only say that the Lebanese are experts at carrying on regardless. I don’t need a flak jacket after all.

Putting the ‘sharing’ back into the sharing economy

By Adam Parsons

In recent years, a new kind of economy based on the age-old practice of sharing is flourishing across North America and Europe, and is now rapidly spreading in popularity throughout the Middle East and other world regions.

The enemies of economic stimulus

By Philip A Farruggio

Call me a socialist, a communist, a radical, whatever. What matters are the ideas one presents to make this a better place to live and grow. Period!

Thursday

May Day is for salvation

By Joseph M. Cachia

Many of us never learned in school that May Day, the most widely celebrated holiday in the world, was born in the USA in 1886.

Wealthy U.S. apparatchiks rally to the New World Order

By Wayne Madsen

In the oligarchy known as the United States of America, it is now commonplace for second-generation retired Foreign Service officers like Christopher R. Hill to rally behind the cause of the “New World Order.”

So much for economic fairness and progress

By Richard John Stapleton

Here is a well reasoned and said article, “The Doctrine of Fairness: It is Time,” and my reaction: One can build the case the Great Depression of the 1930s proved unfettered capitalism does not work for long under normal conditions.

Raising up compliant children in the American police state

By John W. Whitehead

How do you persuade a nation of relatively freedom-loving individuals to march in lockstep with a police state? You start by convincing them that they’re in danger, and only the government can protect them. Keep them keyed up with constant danger alerts, and the occasional terrorist incident, whether real or staged. Distract them with wall-to-wall news coverage about sinking ships, disappearing planes and pseudo-celebrities spouting racist diatribes. Use blockbuster movies, reality shows and violent video games to hype them up on military tactics, and then while they’re distracted and numb to all that is taking place around them, indoctrinate their young people to your way of thinking, relying primarily on the public schools and popular culture.

DHS TSA corruption—so what else is new?

By Lisa Simeone

A report came out last week exposing corruption at the Department of Homeland Security, with the DHS inspector general in cahoots with other officials high up in the administration.

Friday

A new cold war or just America’s need for a villain?

By John Chuckman

We read a lot about a new Cold War, and I think there is truth in the words. Obama’s so-called “pivot” towards Asia is clearly directed at China’s emergence as a great power, at the notion of containing China, to use the very word, coined by the American State Department’s George F. Kennan and used for many years to characterize America’s policy towards the Soviet Union.

Obama’s sanctions on Russia triggering global recession

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—The White House media spinmeisters and the talking heads of Bloomberg News and CNBC dare not say it but the sanctions on Russia, being crafted by Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew’s team at the Department of Treasury, are beginning to take their toll on the economies of the United States and western Europe.

US economy is a house of cards

By Paul Craig Roberts

The US economy is a house of cards. Every aspect of it is fraudulent, and the illusion of recovery is created with fraudulent statistics.

Fast food pulls a fast one

Our tax dollars are subsidizing both the fast-food workers who need the help and the companies’ CEOs who don’t

By Michael Winship

Bad enough that the empty calories of many a fast-food meal have all the nutritional value of a fingernail paring. Even worse, the vast profits this industry pulls in are lining the pockets of its CEOs while many of those who work in the kitchens and behind the counters are struggling to eke out a living and can’t afford a decent meal, much less a fast one.

Palestinian unity: Hope and gloom in the Beach Refugee Camp

By Ramzy Baroud

For years, Palestinian factions have strived for unity, and for years unity has evaded them. But is it possible that following several failed attempts, Fatah and Hamas have finally found that elusive middle ground? And if they have done so, why, to what end, and at what cost?

Week of April 21, 2014

Monday

The second mystery around Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370

By John Chuckman

A second mystery around the disappearance of Flight MH370 has largely gone unnoticed: why hasn’t the United States been in the forefront of providing information about it? The implications of this question are massive.

UN panel: Renewables, not nukes, can solve climate crisis

By Harvey Wasserman

The authoritative Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has left zero doubt that we humans are wrecking our climate.

Survival is the Saudi dynasty’s keyword

By Nicola Nasser

Survival is the keyword to understanding the Saudi dynasty’s latest external and internal policies. These are designed to preempt change but paradoxically they are creating more enemies in a changing world order marked by turbulent regional geopolitics and growing internal demands for change.

Washington’s corruption and mendacity is what makes America “exceptional”

By Paul Craig Roberts

World events permitting, I am going to take a few days off.

Really paying it forward

By Missy Comley Beattie

Recently, I read an article about the aging population, specifically, those who have Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, and the burden placed on families, society, and health care. As always, I looked at reader reactions. A man said he’s saving for the likelihood of an Alzheimer’s diagnosis, long-term care in a facility, so his children won’t have to bear the responsibility. I agree with the person who said she’d take her own life if diagnosed with a mind-robbing, progressive condition. You know, go while the going is good.

Tuesday

‘Believe only half of what you see and none of what you hear’

By Frank Scott

That advice in song (‘I Heard It Through The Grapevine’) from a great Motown artist of the 1960s (Marvin Gaye) was never more meaningful than at present, especially concerning the alleged crisis in the Ukraine.

We don’t want you to swim in the river

By Kathy Kelly

In early April, the U.S. Navy unveiled its Mach 7 Magnetic Mangler, “a railgun straight out of Star Trek that can take out targets at 100 miles with a projectile flying at nearly 7,000 feet per second.” So far, the U.S. military has spent $240 million developing the railgun over a period of ten years. CBS News reports that the railgun won’t go to sea until 2016, but one article, published in The Gazette, suggests that the U.S. military may have decided to show off the Magnetic Mangler in order to send a message to the Russian government.

A dean of a medical school on a drug company board?

By Martha Rosenberg

Walid Gellad, MD, MPH, is both assistant professor of medicine and assistant professor of health policy at the University of Pittsburgh and a physician in the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Pittsburgh Healthcare System. He is coauthor of a recent research letter in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) [Academic Medical Center Leadership on Pharmaceutical Company Boards of Directors, also by Timothy Anderson, MD, Chester Good, MD, MPH, and Shravan Dave, BS] that reveals almost all US large drug companies and 40 percent of all drug companies studied have leaders in academic medical centers on their boards. These drug company board members include deans, chief executive officers, department chairs, trustees at academic medical centers, school of pharmacy officials and university presidents.

Israel bonds are a high risk investment

Inappropriate for US states and municipalities

By John Taylor

One might argue against the sale of Development Corporation for Israel bonds, aka Israel bonds, to government entities in the USA because the proceeds fund Israeli violations of international law, particularly the colonization of the West Bank, and other activities which violate internationally accepted norms, to include maintaining Gaza as a vast open air prison. But although these policies are likely to have a negative impact on Israel’s credit rating in the future, it is the characteristics of the bonds themselves, chiefly their illiquidity, which should put them off limits for states and municipalities in the first place. Treasurers and pension fund managers who buy these toxic, illiquid obligations are putting taxpayers and retirees at risk.

Sitcoms not always a laughing matter

By Walter Brasch

My favorite new TV comedy is “Growing Up Fisher.”

Wednesday

Soros aggression abroad exposed for all to see by his henchmen

By Wayne Madsen

Perhaps not since the days of Prince Klemens von Metternich and Mayer Amschel Rothschild has the world witnessed a malevolent behind-the-scenes power broker like international hedge fund mogul and national economy manipulator like George Soros. Although Soros has been fairly public about his ultimate goals, which include the dissolution of the Russian Federation and the People’s Republic of China, it is his henchmen—those who are employed by his Open Society Foundations and Institute—who carry out Soros’s orders on the ground.

Beware of aid agencies bearing gifts

By Linda S. Heard

There is no such thing as a free lunch as states that are recipients of Western aid understand only too well. The naive may believe that foreign aid is a tool to help developing countries; sceptics are convinced it’s a quid pro quo enabling wealthy powers to exercise geopolitical policy objectives.

Freedom Rider: NYPD punishes black victims

By Margaret Kimberley

In the United States the blindfolded figure representing justice is a sham. Not only can she see but she also has her thumb firmly on the scales that she holds for dramatic effect. All evidence points to the fact that justice in this country is far from blind. She sees skin color quite clearly and makes sure that anyone of a darker hue is placed under lock and key for any and every reason

White privilege

By Dave Alpert

Who is Frazier Glenn Miller? A white man with a long history of anti-Semitism and racism, a former grand dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, a man who arbitrarily shot and killed three people on Sunday, April 13.

Postcard from the end of America: Bensalem, Pennsylvania

By Linh Dinh

When I told my friend, Anwar, of my plan to traverse Bensalem by foot, he laughed, “You can’t even walk there. There are no sidewalks!” Though this is not quite true, I did find myself mostly schlepping on edges of roads or people’s lawns. To not get splattered by SUVs, sometimes I had to hop puddles or even step in mud.

Thursday

CIA conspiracy operations are confirmed in CIA’s own report

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—It is now well-known that the CIA concocted the term “conspiracy theory” to defame those who questioned the official government conclusion on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy: single gunman, single fatal bullet, case closed. In his book, “Conspiracy Theory in America,” Professor Lance deHaven Smith of Florida State University writes, “The CIA’s campaign to popularize the term ‘conspiracy theory’ and make conspiracy belief a target of ridicule and hostility must be credited, unfortunately, with being one of the most successful propaganda initiatives of all time.”

Are you eating these foods full of estrogen?

By Martha Rosenberg

It is no secret that our bodies and environment are swimming in estrogen. Puberty is occurring as early as eight-years-old in children and recently babies in China developed breasts. Frogs and fish are becoming “intersex” and losing their male characteristics from excreted estrogens in the environment and waterways. In England, the Daily Mail ran a feature on the phenomenon of women’s bra cup sizes increasing independent of their weights, likely because of environmental and livestock chemicals. The website Green Prophet, speculated that women in the Middle East are not yet experiencing cup inflation because their environments have not become similarly estrogenized.

Privatization is a ramp for corruption and insouciance is a ramp for war

The New York Times has acquired a new Judith Miller

By Paul Craig Roberts

Libertarian ideology favors privatization. However, in practice privatization is usually very different in result than libertarian ideology postulates. Almost always, privatization becomes a way for well-connected private interests to loot both the public purse and the general welfare.

Private prisons: The Injustice League

By Editor

The two largest private prison providers in the U.S. each rake in tens of millions of dollars every year. How do they make their money, and what agreements are in place to protect their profits?

Guantanamo Bay: America’s Sevastopol?

By Sean Fenley

Not only is Guantanamo Bay an illicit torture and concentration camp for alleged terrorists, but numerous legitimately recognized legal scholars have called into question the continued acceptance of the US government to still be occupying its military enclave there.

Friday

Wall Street greed: Not too big for a California jury

By Ellen Brown, J.D.

Sixteen of the world’s largest banks have been caught colluding to rig global interest rates. Why are we doing business with a corrupt global banking cartel?

US threatens Russia

By Stephen Lendman

Washington bears full responsibility for elevating illegitimate fascist putschists to power. Doing so reflects another sordid chapter in US history. For sure, it won’t be the last.

Government = protection racket for the 1 percent

By Bill Moyers and Michael Winship

The evidence of income inequality just keeps mounting. According to “Working for the Few,” a recent briefing paper from Oxfam, “In the US, the wealthiest one percent captured 95 percent of post-financial crisis growth since 2009, while the bottom 90 percent became poorer.”

Freedom Rider: Democracy is dead

By Margaret Kimberley

Too many Americans love to boast that the United States is a democracy. That idea is accepted uncritically and celebrated as proof of this country’s superiority. Every public activity and event is an opportunity for the false narrative to be repeated and indulged. Events as disparate as elections, holiday celebrations, advertisements, school commencements and religious worship are all used to propagandize and create false belief about the degree of power the average citizen has vis-a-vis their government.

Martin Indyk’s galloping horse: Moral crisis at heart of Obama’s peace

By Ramzy Baroud

To understand how thoughtless the US latest ‘peace process’ drive has been, one only needs to consider some of the characters involved in this political theater. One particular character who stands out as a testament to the inherently futile exercise is Martin Indyk.

Week of April 14, 2014

Monday

Big lies drown out truth

By Stephen Lendman

Beating up on Russia persists irresponsibly daily. Big Lies repeat ad nsuseam. Truth is systematically suppressed.

Assad is there to stay

By Nicola Nasser

Long gone are the days when the U.S.-led so-called “Friends of Syria” could plausibly claim that two thirds of Syria was controlled by rebel forces, that the Syrian capital, Damascus, was under siege and its fall was just a matter of time and that the days of President Bashar al-Assad were numbered and, accordingly, he “should step down.”

How the CIA made ‘Dr. Zhivago’ into a weapon

By Paul Craig Roberts

American Cold War propaganda had little, if anything, to do with the collapse of the Soviet Union. However, by dramatizing Soviet mendacity it made the world blind to Washington’s mendacity.

Pope Francis asks forgiveness for child abuse by clergy

By Jerry Mazza

This is a story with which I can identify because I was nearly a victim of a young Catholic priest when I was in my early teens.

TSA anticipates matzo transportation spree

By Lisa Simeone

The Jewish holiday of Passover is on the way (April 14–22). And rest assured: the crack teams of the TSA are ready for it. Since we all know how respectful the TSA is of people’s private belongings, dignity, and integrity, you can count on safe passage for your religious artifacts.

Tuesday

30th meridian: Russia’s Rubicon for NATO-US encroachment

By Ben Tanosborn

Sooner or later it had to happen; the West’s CIA imperial fingers had been playing with Pandora’s Box carelessly in Ukraine and the lid gave way: the box has been opened and the Un-Evil Empire is left buck naked internationally to face the truth. And the truth is clear, raw and simple no matter what machinated twists and turns of propaganda come out of the hawks’ nests in Washington to keep Americans brainwashed, ready to accept the warmongering ways of the nation’s powerful elite.

Freedom Rider: Charter school corruption

By Margaret Kimberley

Every injustice in American life can be laid at the feet of the richest people in the country and the politicians who do their bidding. Nowhere is that terrible dynamic more obvious than in the destruction of public education by the charter school system.

Is the death penalty a deterrent to the rape problem in India?

By Prakash Kona

I was a bit surprised by the dramatic pronouncement of the death penalty on three of the four men convicted in the Mumbai Shakthi Mills gang rape of a 23-year-old photojournalist and more importantly for being “repeat offenders.”

Commercialisation: the antithesis of sharing

By Mohammed Mesbahi

‘Sharing is the key to solving the world’s problems.’ Such a statement is so simple that it may fail to make an appeal, so we must go much deeper into this subject if we want to comprehend what this means. In order to understand how sharing is the surest guide to justice, peace and right human relations, we need to investigate its meaning and significance from many angles—including psychologically and spiritually, as well as from a social, economic and political perspective.

That bigger canvas

George. W. Bush the Googler

By Missy Comley Beattie

George W. Bush’s body of work, “The Art of Leadership: A President’s Personal Diplomacy,” opened Saturday at the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum at Southern Methodist University. The exhibit includes paintings of world leaders as well as Bush in the bath.

Wednesday

The global banking game is rigged and the FDIC is suing

By Ellen Brown, J.D.

Taxpayers are paying billions of dollars for a swindle pulled off by the world’s biggest banks, using a form of derivative called interest-rate swaps; and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation has now joined a chorus of litigants suing over it.

Ukraine’s secret recipe: ‘Brennan Kiev’

By Wayne Madsen

Central Intelligence Agency director John O. Brennan has been cooking up a storm in Ukraine and “Brennan Kiev” is the entrée on the menu. Brennan recently paid a secret visit to the Ukrainian capital to discuss with coup leaders their response to the insurgency sweeping eastern Ukraine. It has been reported by various European news agencies that Brennan landed on April 12 in Kiev with a diplomatic passport under a false identity.

Washington is humanity’s worst enemy

By Paul Craig Roberts

How does Washington get away with the claim that the country it rules is a democracy and has freedom? This absurd claim ranks as one of the most unsubstantiated claims in history.

Were chemical attacks in Syria false flags?

By Linda S. Heard

There was a time when journalistic standards meant reporting facts and not taking sides, but nowadays the news is editorialised; sometimes by presenting one facet of a story; on other occasions by omission.

This is what democracy looks like?

By Dave Alpert

I often hear, maybe too often, about American Exceptionalism. Of course, that doesn’t include South America, Central America, or even Canada. It’s only about the U.S.

Thursday

Hurtling into darkness: America’s great leap towards global tyranny

By John Chuckman

The darkness to which I refer is something largely unanticipated in political studies and even in science fiction, a field which definitely enters this discussion, as readers will see.

Washington drives the world to war

By Paul Craig Roberts

The CIA director was sent to Kiev to launch a military suppression of the Russian separatists in the eastern and southern portions of Ukraine, former Russian territories for the most part that were foolishly attached to the Ukraine in the early years of Soviet rule.

It’s God’s will

By Dave Alpert

I just got finished viewing a You Tube video about Israel’s abuse and mistreatment of Palestinian children. In the video, a Jewish Israeli woman claims that God promised Israel to the Jews and therefore, all non-Jews could accept this and leave voluntarily or stay and have Israeli force confront them.

NSA cable tapping code names explained

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—WMR has learned from knowledgeable National Security Agency sources that most of the world’s voice and textual data is captured and processed by four major signals intelligence activities with the code names of FAIRVIEW, STORMBREW, BLARNEY and OAKSTAR.

Working stiffs, wake up!!

By Philip A Farruggio

The lead story in the March 21 USA Today highlighted how “Corporate chiefs pull in $50 million or more.” The story went on to mention how these corporate gains were unmatched since the Internet IPO craze from the late 90s. These gains spanned the wide spectrum of American industries.

Friday

Remembering Mike Ruppert—and John Judge

By Wayne Madsen

(WMR)—Michael Ruppert and his book “Crossing the Rubicon” and his website “From the Wilderness” were among the few sources of independent thought in the months following the 9/11 attacks. I use “attacks” because this time period not only saw the aerial attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon but also the anthrax attacks on Congress, the U.S. Postal System, and the news media, as well as sniper shootings of people in the metropolitan Washington region. It was during these truly dark days in America and the nation’s capital that this editor wrote for Mike’s “FTW.” And it was “FTW” that, in part, inspired me to start “WMR.” Ruppert demonstrated the absolute need for independent media on the web.

FIDO and General Wesley Clark in Ukraine: US advisors on the ground, deadly messenger

By John Stanton

News that General Wesley Clark, USA (Ret.) visited the Ukraine at the behest of the National Security Advisor there—and also a senior member of Ukraine’s parliament—should be a cause for alarm. A nonprofit foundation was involved in this exercise (more below). There is a sense of open, almost joyful viciousness in all this pro-war, anti-Russian sentiments on opinion pages and television broadcasts. It is certainly racist and demeaning in tone. Such is the first step in convincing the public that the “transgressor” is equivalent to a retrovirus.

Harper rants against Russia

By Jim Miles

It is aggravating to see our little banty rooster chicken-hawk Stephen Harper strut his stuff while he spouts the false corporatist philosophy about freedom and democracy in the Ukraine.

Suffolk University: Partner in Armenian genocide denial?

By Heidi Boghosian

Students at Suffolk University Law School have launched an online petition urging the school’s president to withdraw its invitation to Armenian genocide denier Abraham Foxman to speak at their commencement and receive an honorary degree. Foxman, the Anti-Defamation League director, drew harsh public criticism in 2007 for opposing a congressional resolution acknowledging the 1915 extermination of approximately 1.5 million Armenians. Since the 15th century, Armenians had been treated as second-class citizens under Ottoman rule. In honoring Foxman, Suffolk University sends a message that politics are more important than acknowledging crimes against humanity.

Why Israeli officials are chuckling: The ‘stable’ West Bank dilemma

By Ramzy Baroud

Israel’s deputy foreign minister, Ze’ev Elkin, is a member of Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud party and his predominantly right-wing cabinet. In a recent interview with The Economist, Elkin used the familiar tone of being conceited and oblivious to such notions as international or human rights, and reaffirmed his rejection of a Palestinian state.